About Anne Jones

http://www.jonesfitnessyoga.com

Anne Jones is a yoga teacher, fitness instructor and personal trainer in Cloverdale, B.C. She is a writer, and dedicated dog parent. Anne studied Journalism in Toronto, where she began practicing yoga, and hasn’t stopped. For info about Anne, please visit her website; jonesfitnessyoga.com, and find her on Facebook: www.facebook.com/jonesfityoga or Twitter at @jonesfityoga. You can practice yoga with Anne online at www.YOGO.tv.

Posts by Anne Jones:

Golden Halo Over the Golden Arches

Golden Halo Over the Golden Arches

McDonald’s Canada’s latest advertising campaign is called: “Our Food, Your Questions.”

You may have seen the television commercials or floor-to-ceiling advertisements in SkyTrain stations. The company is basically claiming to be 100 per cent honest, transparent and willing to publicly answer any question posed by the public.

Many questions are answered on a new website: 

http://yourquestions.mcdonalds.ca.

Some examples of answers: McDonald’s food has no MSG, the company uses 100% Canadian Beef, their food does in fact rot, additives used in their food are deemed safe by the World Health Organization, etc.

McDonald's

McDonald’s Canada has a new campaign called “Your Questions,” offering to answer any questions from the public about their food.

So if McDonald’s food is indeed so virtuous, is there still a reason the health-conscious should not eat there?

I posed the question to Pura Vida Nutrition’s Registered Holistic Nutritionist, Gabrielle Eagles.

“It’s great they are making an effort with this campaign,” Eagles says, but she points out that most of the questions actually haven’t been answered. The website seems to answer the same kinds of questions, like “What is the beef made from?” several times, but many other questions are unanswered.

“ I have a hard time trusting what they say, as it took a significant amount of public outcry for them to make these small changes,” Eagles says. “They are a company that tries to ‘get away’ with things and only makes changes when they are caught, so why would I trust them now?”

So why would one still consider not eating at the massive fast-food chain? Eagles explains:

  • The actual food quality. Even if the quality of the food increases, it’s still up to the consumer to make informed choices for their own health. For instance, even if McDonald’s had a truly healthy burger, if the consumer ate one per day, the quantity of red meat in their diet could be detrimental.
  • Not organic. There is substantial research regarding the damages of pesticides and herbicides.
  • Added sugar, which can lead to:
  • Inflammation;
  • damaged arteries, which can leave a person more prone to atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries),  heart attack or stroke;
  • increase in insulin, eventual insulin resistance, more prone to diabetes, and;
  • energy/mood fluctuations throughout the day. As a person’s blood sugar escalates and then crashes, there is the potential for a poor mood, less exercise, and decreased productivity.
  • White buns have very few nutrients, so they mostly turn to sucrose. “The whole point of eating is to get quality protein, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals,” Eagles explains. “With processed food, the vitamins and minerals are significantly diminished, and the quality of those macronutrients is very low.” Plus the buns are simply higher in carbohydrate than required by the body.
    • Fats: “I don’t see any high-quality fats, which should make up 30 per cent of calories consumed,” Eagles says. “Good fats come from foods like avocado, nuts, seeds, cold water fish, and olive oil.”
    • Vegetables. “It’s great they have salad now, but it needs to contain rich greens,” Eagles says.

“Ultimately, it’s the consumer’s choice to not eat at a poor-quality food place like McD’s,” Eagles concludes. “No matter how much they try to clean up, they still aren’t serving primarily vegetables from gardens full of vitamins and minerals, which is what people really need.”

Nada Nidra: The Adventure of a Lifetime

Nada Nidra: The Adventure of a Lifetime

One rarely expects to go to a yoga class and not move at all. But during Yoga Nidra, that is almost exactly what happens.

One Yoga for the People hosted Nada Nidra: The Adventure of a Lifetime Friday night.

At first read, “The adventure of a lifetime” sounds a bit dramatic, but after experiencing Nada and Nidra yogic techniques, one really feels as though they have been on an internal adventure. Yoga Nidra is an empowering practice that guides you towards living in the moment. Heather Eschuk led the ancient Nidra practice, which was complimented by Mike Nichols’ chimes, crystal and Tibetan singing bowls.

The practice began with a beautiful sea of Oms. In a hot room full of so many voices, it was a lovely sound and a nice opportunity to explore the sound of your own Om without judgment. Before class began, Mike advised students that some people can find the sound of the bowls a bit intense; and that participants are welcome to cover their ears or lie on their side. He and Heather also mentioned that students are welcome to move during the Yoga Nidra if they feel the need, which was nice to know.

Mike began the class with a few Yin poses – Caterpillar, pigeon, a little self-jaw-massage, some supported bridge pose and gentle twists – to the sound of the bowls, which helped to bring the attention deep into the body. After this, Heather began to pilot us through the Yoga Nidra experience, which took about 50 minutes. Everybody spent most of the Yoga Nidra in a physical Savasana. Towards the end, as students became more awake and restless, we were encouraged to practice some gentle postures.

Towards the end of the practice, Heather summed up the experience of Yoga Nidra perfectly by calling it: “presence in your own innate wellbeing.”

Check out Heather’s website: www.heathereschuk.com. Mike teaches at Shine Yoga in Vancouver.

Yoga & Vogue-ing with Madonna

Yoga & Vogue-ing with Madonna

Madonna is coming to town September 29 and on Friday night, she was honoured by a special yoga practice led by Amy Holt in Langley.

Amy’s Yoga Vogue to Madonna was a 90-minute yoga practice in tribute to the musical powerhouse and style icon. The class consisted of 30 minutes of flow, 30 minutes of fun partner work and 30 minutes of more restorative and Yin-inspired poses, all to the soundtrack of Madge, including songs like Material Girl and Vogue.

The first third of the class included some sexy flow sequences, groin openers, and hip thrusting that made you feel as though you were in a music video. In the middle of the class, we got into partners and did funky paired-up poses including Balasana and Upavista Konasana with one partner draped over the other’s back (gentle thigh massages optional), and a delicious Thai Yoga back massage exercise.

Double Down Dog

Amy Holt and Desiree Cabalfin demonstrating Double Downward Facing Dog Friday, September 21 at Yoga Vogue to Madonna at Hari Om Yoga in Langley.

The beautiful Amy wore a black, sequined mini-dress and purple tights. Colourful photographs of Madonna taken throughout the decades were sprinkled around the upstairs studio at Hari Om Yoga Langley, where the special Friday-night class took place. It was a full house – mostly women, but a couple of male Madge-lovers, too. Several of the participants were ticketholders for Madonna’s Vancouver show.

And as if there weren’t enough spice during the practice, there were sultry treats waiting outside after class: candy kisses and spicy dark chocolate.

The event was one of Hari Om Yoga’s $10 Friday-night events, which they schedule almost weekly throughout the Fall.

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