Teachers

Get Cosy and Hip with Partner Yoga and Tragically Hips!

Get Cosy and Hip with Partner Yoga and Tragically Hips!

While I don’t normally tout the praises of my own classes, this week I’m going to without compunction! I’m so excited about two of my upcoming special events and cannot help but share in hopes of meeting and teaching Vancouver Yoga Review’s loyal readers.

This Friday, I’m teaming up with a fantastic fellow teacher, Sean O’Leary (of Jungle Love and Bhakti Dub fame) for a Friday night, pre-Cupid, Partner Yoga session. Partner Yoga is a very sweet and connected practice – if you haven’t tried to before, it’s a real treat.

On Friday, Feb 10, from 8-9:30pm, join Sean and myself for Partner Yoga at Hari Om Yoga in Langley.  There will be therapeutic techniques, sweet adjustments, lots of fun, and even time for a little massage at the end! Don’t worry if your partner is absolutely new to yoga – this class is for all levels.

Bring a friend, spouse, co-worker, sibling, parent or child and prepare to feel good and have lots of fun! For only $25+hst per couple, it’s cheaper and sweeter than going to the movies!

I’ll be following this special class with a repeat, back-by-popular-demand, event – again at Hari Om Yoga – called Tragically Hips next Friday, Feb 17, from 8-9:30pm ($10+hst). Love (or hate) hip-openers? Get hip with this entertaining Friday night class to the tunes of the classic Canadian band. Bring your friends and expect to laugh and move your way to a fun Friday night!

For either or both of these Friday night events, call now (604-539-0566) or visit Hari Om Yoga in person (20230 64th ave, Langley) to register your spot.

Share my excitement for these entertaining special event yoga classes! I look forward to seeing you there!

Join me for Partner Yoga and Tragically Hips! See you there!!!

Yoga for Snowboarders: Preventative Medicine for Shredders with Teresa Campbell

Yoga for Snowboarders: Preventative Medicine for Shredders with Teresa Campbell

Yoga Therapist and rider Teresa Campbell, is providing a workshop at Semperviva to help boarders stretch out their winter season. Saturday, Feb 4, 3:15pm-5:30pm at City Centre Semperviva, $45+hst. For more information about Teresa and this exciting event, visit Semperviva’s event listing here.

Prepare in the most powerful way for a season of amazing riding and do all that you can to ensure that your body will allow for a continued love affair with the slopes and the most EPIC season ever! This workshop is preventative medicine for shredders, so you can spend less time with chiros, physios and hot pack and MORE time on the slopes carving out your bliss!

Teresa weaves together insights from her knowledge and experiences as a yoga therapist and years of riding and healing her own injuries.

We will focus on parts of the body most vital to snowboarders and learn simple pre-riding prep and post riding decompression routines that will improve your riding and decrease chance of injury.

  • increase core strength, range of motion, breathing, balance, alleviate joint stiffness, condition and prep muscles for the stresses of riding
  • develop and maintain the conditioning needed for blissful boarding
  • learn quick recovery so you can get the most out of the upcoming season
  • improve technique and form and overall shredding BLISS

No yoga experience necessary. All ages welcome!

 

source: http://www.semperviva.com/events/yoga-for-snowboarders-preventative-medicine-for-shredders/

The (Me)ntal (Heal)th of Yoga

The (Me)ntal (Heal)th of Yoga

Most of us recognize that when we breath and move, we feel better.  Slowing down and taking time to de stress, relaxes our body and mind, isn’t just a “buzz phrase.” There are physiological, as well as psychological proven benefits that extend well beyond the mat when you practice yoga and deeply affects your mental health.

Thursday night I held a salon conversation connecting youth with the positive platform of mental health and at risk youth. Yoga came up frequently,  from all the speakers, as one of the best forms of exercise that can be implemented into schools to help promote self confidence, discipline, and balance.

Lets dig deeper and answer these questions…

Can yoga help them do more than just feel a little bit better?

Can it heal their mental illness?

Yoga has long been seen as a tool for improving mental health, although concepts of what that entails have shifted over time and are distinct in different cultures. Not to mention mental health statistics vary globally.

Mental illness affects 1 in every 3 Canadians, and what most of us do not realize is that suicide is the second largest killer of young adults between the ages of 15-24. The annual National Survey on Drug Use and Health, states about 20 percent of adults suffer some sort of mental illness each year, and about 5 percent experience a serious disorder that disrupts work, family or social life. In Canada, one 1 out of every 6 children or youth has access to mental health resources. These are staggering numbers.

There are several schools of yoga that focus specifically on the intersections between asana practice and emotional health, and a growing body of studies indicates that yoga is often an excellent tool to treat the troubled mind.

My personal opinion on style is through experience with populations who have or are at risk for mental illness, and what I have found works for clients with mood disorders and especially my work with vets in the Canadian Armed Forces, injured in combat, a Yin style or light Vinyasa seem to have the largest affect. Both involve breath work and slow, controlled movement.

To date, the most persuasive evidence of the benefits of hatha yoga, and in particular pranayama, stems from research conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience  in India. New studies have shown a high success rate—up to 73 percent—for treating depression with breathing. .” It involves breathing naturally through the nose, mouth closed, in three distinct rhythms.

Yoga has been integrated into many high stress service careers; such as police departments and the Canadian Armed Forces. People who suffer from operational stress injuries or jobs that are high stress physically, as well as mentally are at greater risk, and Yoga can help combat high stress levels. Stress is one of the key factors in the onset of depression and anxiety.

Other benefits of yoga on our mental can include; improved ability to sleep, better moods, increased feelings of self-control, and better concentration and focus.

 

 

Sources:

Check out the full report in The Washington Post : http://wapo.st/wzYeST

Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA): http://vancouver-burnaby.cmha.bc.ca/

 

Bhakti Dub and Jungle Love – Yoga, Bliss and Reggae with Sean O’Leary

Bhakti Dub and Jungle Love – Yoga, Bliss and Reggae with Sean O’Leary

Source: http://www.kushalayoga.com/about/our-instructors/sean-oleary/

This Friday and next Saturday, make plans to spend a heart-felt, spiritually-uniting, jamming practice with Sean O’Leary!

Sean will be sharing two joyous yoga sessions in the upcoming weeks: Jungle Love at Hari Om Yoga in Langley on Friday (Jan 20) and Bhakti Dub next Saturday (Jan 28) ay Kushala Yoga in Suter Brook, Port Moody.

 If you haven’t taken a class with Sean before, you’ll love him. His warmth and enthusiasm will brighten even the snowiest day, and the practice he leads always leaves you feeling buoyant and sweet. And yes, he is always that happy. Don’t miss out on these unique classes!

From Kushala Yoga:

My brother from another mother, my sister from a different mister, let us unite! Come for an afternoon of bliss (ananda), with me (Sean), and embrace the art of Bhakti. This all levels asana class will focus on building community, friendship, and unconditional love for your neighbor. The twist will be the funky rhythms of reggae and dub filling the room with good vibrations.

Visionaries like Bob Marley and Peter Tosh had a heartfelt belief that all hate, inequality, and racism in the world could be cured through music. This one love mentality will be magnified through a series of group asana (poses) and partner assists. Everyone has an inborn natural desire to love, embrace and radiate happiness. So come groove, laugh, connect, share, and amplify your love for all people in the universe.

Join Sean for the sweetness of a loving practice to warm the soul:

Jungle Love at Hari Om Yoga in Langley

Friday, Jan 20, 8pm-9:30pm, $10+hst drop-in

Bhakti Dub at Kushala Yoga at Suter Brook, Port Moody

Saturday, Jan 28, 3pm – 4:30pm
By donation to Hungry For Life International

Shouldering Responsibility: The Nervous Systems Highway (week three)

Shouldering Responsibility: The Nervous Systems Highway (week three)

Fascia is our third top communicator in our body, thus it’s no wonder that it is often described as our body’s natural transportation system (next to the nervous system). As we know it is a web of tiny fluid filled microtubules that exist in a multidimensional structure surrounding every cell in our body, head to toe, in and around every organ, muscle and joint. Microscopically, fascia is arranged in tiny micro-tubules, composed of collagen and elastin. Form follows function and these tubules act as a mini transportation system.  Blood vessels and nerves travel within our fascial highway. In turn, fascia itself receives a profound number of nerve endings and innervates 10 times more than muscle. It is a fundamental structure in which the circulatory system and nervous system rely on sensory feedback and input/output.

Majority of chronic pain in the body is caused by dysfunction in the muscles, instability or lack of mobility.  In other words, chronically tight or strained muscles that are stuck in patterns of compensation are frequently at the root of significant pain, as well as the pain referral will usually show significant breakdowns in other areas along the restricted line or muscular sling. It’s common for muscular imbalances to build up in the body without any symptoms at first. The body is extremely dynamic and will often adjust itself to numerous imbalances for long periods of time without there being any pain at all.

Many rotator cuff injuries are secondary to fascial problems. Shoulder problems may be due to the blade not gliding or a restriction in the ribs that prevent the arm from going up and extending the way it should. Failure to resolve patterns of muscular compensation through appropriate treatment can predispose the shoulder to further injury.

Sometimes a simple movement such as reaching behind you or above you can push the problem over the brink.  For instance, lets use “frozen shoulder” as an example; which is a pain in the deltoid muscle, caused by strain and fatigue when the shoulder blade no longer moves freely. After a while, the deltoid becomes ischemic, meaning it’s blood flow is significantly reduced. And then you have a muscle that’s working overtime, without an adequate supply of blood to nourish it.

A protective neuromuscular response in the body, is to limit movement to avoid further pain or damage and thus allowing the fascia to shorten up and inhibiting muscular movement. This can lead to stress and inactivity, which can result in unconscious bracing of the shoulder muscles and gradual tightening of the surrounding tissue.

Neuromuscular re patterning and structural integration are ways that can assist the body in reaching it’s ultimate alignment.  They involve an analysis of the existing alignment and patterning within the body, manipulation of the soft tissues including muscles, ligaments and fascia, and a plan that will encourage the body to stay aligned between sessions.

Modification of upper arm coordination and shoulder girdle placement is greatest addressed in conjunction with alterations in the cervical vertebrae and tonic neck reflexes

For lasting shoulder pain relief, it’s essential to follow the stages of rehabilitation in the proper order:

1. Eliminate spasms, fascial binding and hypercontraction in the tissues (Manual therapy such a neuromuscular therapy, myofascial release, structural integration bodywork)

2. Restore proper biomechanics (Soft-tissue re-patterning, corrective movement, structural bodywork)

3. Restore flexibility to the tissues (Stretching, somatic movement, structural yoga, fascial stretch therapy)

4. Rebuild the strength of the injured tissues (Physical therapy exercises, corrective movement, strength conditioning)

5. Build endurance (Aerobic exercise)

Shouldering Responsibility: When Mobility Goes Over(your)head? (Week Two)

Shouldering Responsibility: When Mobility Goes Over(your)head? (Week Two)

Raise your arms overhead. If you can’t extend your arms up without your arms bending or feel tension in your neck or how about scrunch your face up like you just ate something sour – then you are in for some challenges in your yoga practice! Guaranteed downward facing dog is probably not your favorite pose, but do not fear because improving your shoulder mobility and fascial elasticity in your arm lines can be done, with a few simple corrective movements.

As we know, corrective movement is all about unblocking tension and reducing compensations through better movement mechanics. This is why it is said that Yoga is 90% waste removal. Our fascia plays a significant role in integrating the systems that aid in removing waste and unwanted tension that is limiting our movement and experience on and off the mat.  Many systems integrate together to achieve this, and the facial system is a large contributor.

Most injuries are connective-tissue (fascial) based, not muscular injuries (this happens after the body’s blocked energy has to go somewhere, and results in an ”ouchie”—so how do we best train to prevent and repair damage and build elasticity and resilience into the system? By listening to our body, and be reducing tension on the joints.

When we talk about shoudlering responsibility, the deep arm lines – take the front lines!

The fascia of the upper torso and arms are comprised of multiple designations (4) intertwined in the webbed matrix known as the “Deep Arm Fascial Lines.” The 4 Arm Lines run from the front and back of the axial torso to the tips of the fingers. These lines connect seamlessly into the other fascia lines particularly the Lateral, Functional, Spiral, and Superficial Front Lines.

These lines (for which we have 2 on either side of the body) are the following:

The Brachial Fascia, derived from the Pectoralis major and latissimus dorsi medially and from the deltoids laterally. It differs in thickness, being thin over the biceps brachii,  but thicker where it covers the tricpes brachii and is continuous by covering the deltoids, and the pectoals group attaching above (and to) the clavicle,  acromion as well as the spine of the scapula.  This fascial line forms a thin, loose, membranous sheath for the muscles of the arm and is composed of fibers disposed in a circular or spiral direction, and connected together by vertical and oblique fibers.

The  antebrachial fascia (or antibrachial fascia, deep fascia of forearm) is continuous with the above , as with the brachii fascia and follows from the elbow to the wrist and finger tips via the the palmar fascia; which consists of resistant fibrous tissue arranged in longitudinal, transverse, oblique, and vertical fibers and is a dense, membranous investment, which forms a general sheath for the muscles in this region.

The Arm Lines affect posture indirectly, since they are not part of the structural column; however they are integral for sensory input in response to our environment; such as examining, pushing, pulling, manipulating and interacting with our external world.

When we talk about the arm lines, you will also notice we have included the pectorals group and the latissimus dorsi as significant muscles contributing to the efficiency of shoulder mobility. These two muscular groups contribute substantially to tight “shoulders” when they too are tight, because they significantly limit shoulder flexion in overhead extension, as well as pull the shoulder into internal rotation, which can lead to kyphotic posture and forward head carriage.

Another honorable mention in shoulder limitation is the rhomboids group (sitting in between your  spine and your shoulder blades).  These muscles pull your shoulder blades towards the spine and promote a proud chest. If tight these muscles will prevent the scapula from movement at all.

Fortunately, there are many Yoga poses you can perform to improve your shoulder mobility and alignment in downward facing dog, shoulder stands and inversion.  Try adding these shoulder openers to your home practice and move more freely:

  • Myofasical release with the foam roller –  ( focus on mid back and under the arm for the lats)
  • Thoracic Extension with a towel or roller for chest expansion –  (place along the length of the spine)
  • Eagle Pose (arms) – (stretches the rhomboids)
  • Cow Face Pose – (arms) – stretches the triceps, lats and shoulders)
  • Bridge Pose – (passive bridge, place a block under the hips along the pelvic ridge and sacrum)
  • All fours posture with reversed palms – (stretches the anterior forearms and biceps group)
  • Cobra Pose – (focuses on stabilization of the spine and spinal flexion)
Vancouver Yoga Review Author Featured On The Georgia Straight!

Vancouver Yoga Review Author Featured On The Georgia Straight!

Vancouver Yoga Review author, Sarah Jamieson, is currently featured on the cover of the Georgia Straight magazine. This inspiring yoga teacher and movement coach is running for the world to raise money for charity:

Nearly a decade ago, the North Vancouver native made it her goal to raise $1 million for charity by the time she hit 35, a venture she’s dubbed Run for a Cause. Now 32, she’s raised almost $800,000, logging thousands of kilometres running at home and abroad to support organizations such as the Canadian Mental Health Association, the Vancouver Police Foundation, and Engineers Without Borders, among many others […]

Read the full article here or pick up a print copy. Congrats Sarah!

“Beyond Addiction: The Possible Self”: An event with Dr. Gabor Maté

“Beyond Addiction: The Possible Self”: An event with Dr. Gabor Maté

Source: banyen.com/events.htm

On Monday, Jan 9 at 7pm, Banyen Books is hosting “Beyond Addiction: The Possible Self,” a public talk and book signing with Dr. Gabor Maté! This is going to be an exciting event!

Dr Maté is a Vancouver physician, author and public speaker who specializes in the study and treatment of addiction and mind/body health. He has authored the best-selling In the Realm of the Hungry Ghosts: Close Encounters with Addiction, Hold on to Your Kids, When the Body Says No and Scattered Minds: A New Look at the Origins and Healing of Attention Deficit Disorder.  Full event details can be found on the Banyen Books website. The talk will cover:

Addictions of all kinds consume us, and take us away from our true nature. We are only free and independent when we release all identifications from the past that have coalesced to form a false identity. Dr Maté, author of In the Realm of Hungry Ghosts will discuss the mindset and practices required to support a commitment to our authentic self. A great way to begin the new year!

Dr Maté will be joined by Sat Dharam Kaur ND, creator of Beyond Addiction: The Yogic Path to Recovery; Satwinder Kaur, program graduate and Julia Wilson, yoga researcher. Sat Dharam Kaur

Sat Dharam Kaur ND is an award-winning naturopathic doctor who has been practicing and teaching Kundalini Yoga for 35 years. She is the author of The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Women’s Health and The Complete Natural Medicine Guide to Breast Cancer and is completing a book that addresses yogic and naturopathic treatment of addiction.

Julia Wilson has been workingJulia Wilsonwithin the addictions field since 2006. She is currently an addictions counselor with experience in group and individual therapy as well as workshops and lecture style education sessions. Julia has worked as a primary researcher on projects in Vancouver’s downtown eastside in collaboration with Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users (VANDU) and W2 Community Media Arts. Julia is also a Yoga Alliance registered yoga teacher and teaches at various yoga studios and addiction treatment centers throughout Greater Vancouver.

Satwinder Kaur lives in Satwinder KaurVancouver, and is a certified Kundalini Yoga teacher who completed the Beyond Addiction program in Toronto in 2011. She currently leads workshops and teaches the program, and is motivated to help create a healing space in Vancouver for people to recover from addiction.

The event will take place on Mon, Jan 9 at 7pm at the Unitarian Church (949 W49 Ave, Vancouver). Tickets are $11 (available for purchase through Banyen Books either by phone or in person, 604-737-8858).

A Guide to Shouldering Responsibility: Be Shoulder Savvy (Week One)

A Guide to Shouldering Responsibility: Be Shoulder Savvy (Week One)

Being shoulder savvy in your yoga practice is a great asset to both being a teacher and a student. Your shoulder joint and the proper functioning of the muscles associated with the movement of your shoulder joint and shoulder girdle are paramount in yoga and many yoga postures.

When we think of the shoulder, we tend to think of only the joint itself. The shoulder girdle, the shoulder girdle consists of several bony joints, or “articulations”, which connect the upper limbs to the rest of the skeleton, along with attachment sites of the connective tissue  and provide a large range of movement (hence it’s known as a ball and socket joint). The shoulder girdle may also see this referred to as the “pectoral girdle.”  The main bones which form the shoulder girdle are the clavicle, the scapula and the humerus.

Shoulder Anatomy 101:

There are three main joints in the shoulder girdle, these are the glenohumeral joint (GHJ),  acromioclavicular joint (ACJ), and the sternoclavicular joint (SCJ), all of which come into play in many yoga postures such as downward facing dog, upward facing dog, shoulder poses and inversions.

When asked to locate the shoulder, most often people will point to the glenohumeral joint, which provides a large proportion of the movement at the shoulder girdle; however the ACJ and the SCJ joints are just as integral in load distribution and muscular recruitment in all yoga postures. The ACJ is formed at the lateral end of the clavicle and is important in transmitting load and force through the upper limb and shoulder to the axial skeleton. The ACJ has minimal mobility due to its supporting ligaments; whereas the SCJ occurs at the sternal end of the clavicle, the cartilage of the first rib and lateral, upper portion of the sternum, which functions in all movements of the upper limbs and plays a larger role in throwing or thrusting movement patterns.

Another important (and often neglected) joint that permits movement and postural awareness is the scapulothoracic joint ; which supports movement and stabilization of the shoulder. It overlies the 2nd – 7th ribs, is tilted slightly forwards by an angle of 30°, and is encased by 17 muscles which provide control and stabilization against the thoracic wall (the ribcage). Even though it is not technically a “joint” it is referred to as one because of its functionality.  This joint relies entirely on the surrounding musculature for its control and aids in movement of the skeleton and spine. During elevation the glenohumeral joint rotates 2° for every 1° of scapulothoracic rotation.

How can we protect our shoulder joint in Yoga, as well as off the mat?

Learning to engage and strengthen the rotator cuff muscles and the muscles associated with our posture is crucial to preventing common shoulder injuries. For students who lack mobility, learning how to properly improve mobility to the muscles surrounding these joints will reduce tension and force to the joint structure, as well as improve proper recruitment and motor control through movement and postures.

 

The rotator cuff consists of the subscapularis, infraspinatus, teres minor, and supraspinatus. This group is one of the most important but widely misunderstood structures in the body. The names of three of the muscles give you a clue to their location: subscapularis sits under the scapula, between the ribs and the front surface of the scapula. Supraspinatus sits above and infraspinatus sits below the spine of the scapula. Teres minor sits on the outer edge of the scapula, near the posterior fold of the armpit.

Its job is to support and position the ball that forms the head of the humerus and fits in the socket of the shoulder joint. The shoulder is inherently an unstable joint, so building the strength of these supporting muscles is crucial to proper functioning.

These important external rotators, infraspinatus and teres minor, are the part of the rotator cuff that is strengthened in Downward Dog. A weakened rotator cuff might lead to abnormal shoulder-movement patterns, which can contribute to inflammation and pain. Not only that, but weak muscles are likely to tear when you put a load on them that they aren’t strong enough to handle. Thus practice makes perfect, and to do so stay focused on the transitional movements and modify if necessary.

When I teach downward dog to students, I have them start in poses such as an elbow plank to dolphin pose, then from a straight arm plank moving to downward facing dog, cueing on the important of external rotation and recruitment of the shoulder girdle.

Once you’ve mastered keeping the external rotators engaged in these poses, you can apply the action to more challenging poses such as upward-Facing dog and chaturanga dandasana (Four-Limbed Staff Pose), and even into inversions and hand stands.

Adding in a little thoracic spine mobility would also support proper elongation of the spine and assist in deep breathing while moving through pose to pose. Next week we will dive deeper into the functionality of the rotator cuff muscles and it’s association with the fascial system for improved stability and mobility.

 

A “HIP” Guide to Happier Movement: The SI Joint

Tying in the last 2 articles towards happier hip movement, we dive further down the proverbial yoga rabbit hole to look at pelvic rim imbalances and possible sacroiliac pain and how to progress experientially towards a sequence of adaptive yoga moves that have the potential to reset our SI joints to their natural pain free position. One of the most common structural breakdowns I work with is often a “misaligned’ pelvis and lower back pain.

Over the years more and more SI joint dysfunctions or “issues” seems to be “recurring,” especially in women. Whether this is due to the shape of our pelvis, the draw and trend of Western Yoga or the tendency toward long loose ligaments we don’t know, or perhaps even some other stress patterning effects- including an unbalanced or improper yoga practice, women seem more susceptible to hyper-mobility along with SI joint dysfunction. Even though there is a joy in flexibility, there needs to be a balance of tone, flexibility and stability if we are to be “pain free and live a life of symmetry.

There are a number of theories about the details of the pathology related to the SI Joint disorders , however in yoga over stretching is often a key indicator. Strong ligaments hold together the SI joint, the only way to move it out of place with yoga is to overstretch those ligaments and if we stretch more on one side then the other, or more anterior (hip flexors) the posterior (hamstrings) this can throw off pelvic stability. Our bodies move through recruited sequencing of muscles, and therefore, when one set or group of muscles is “too flexible” it throws off the sequencing of the entire mechanical chain.

The cardinal symptom of SI pain is an ache on or around the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS). The PSIS is the rear-most point of bone on the pelvis. However, it’s very important not to confuse what we are calling SI pain with other types of back pain, because, in most cases the “pain” referral point, is only where the energy gets blocked, but the structural breakdown that is causing the mis alignment is usually located some where else  in our mechanics and this takes time to determine.

Sacroiliac Joint Anatomy 101

The sacroiliac joint is where the sacrum bone and the ilium bone join one another, Your sacrum is located at the base of your spine and  is comprised of five vertebrae that have fused together during development to form a single bone roughly the size of your hand. Each half of the pelvis is composed of three bones, the ilium, the ischium and the pubic bone, that are fused together during development. The sacrum sits between the left and right ilium bones and bears the weight of the spine, kind of like a wedge.

The SI joints main function is to distribute this weight with equal balance to each hip and to each leg, and the energy  then makes it’s way down out through the feet to the earth via our muscles (to put it into simple terms).

There are many working parts to the hip and SI Joint, some of the ligaments that stabilize the SI joints cross directly over the line where the sacrum and ilium meet. Those on the front are called the ventral sacroiliac ligaments, and those on the back are the dorsal sacroiliac ligaments. Other strong ligaments (the interosseous ligaments) fill the space just above the SI joints, holding the ilium bones firmly against the sides of the upper sacrum.

Corrective Strategies & Tips:

First, identify the balance of flexibility in the hip joints by extending in all the anatomical movements of that joint. This should be done by a health professional who can assess bio mechanical breakdowns and asymmetries via a selective assessment.

Secondly, work towards establishing stability and tone in the pelvic floor and trunk, learn the ins and outs of balance and breath work for proper intra abdominal pressure, then establish if you require mobility or stability in the hip flexors,  the hamstrings, gluteal and lateral muscles of the hip.

Thirdly, modify your asana practice. As  a general framework for understanding which poses contribute to helping you relieve pain, these poses traditionally fall into 4 categories:

  • Careful with backbends: (Reclining Hero Pose) can help by directly pushing the top of the sacrum backward into place, as well stretching the anterior chain.
  • Modify your Twists and Rotational Poses: wrong twist can easily make matters worse. Gentle movement and transitioning from pose to pose by rotating one side of the sacrum backward and the other forward.
  • Try One Sided Poses: Reclined postures that focus on one side at a time, can create more symmetry by focusing the adjustment specifically on the joint that may be out of alignment, so that the ilium shifts in the right direction relative to the sacrum.
  • Practice Postures that Spread the Sacrum: By applying lateral pressure to the hips, may help by opening the top part of the SI joint space, as well as postures that spread the sacrum wide and relieve pressure to the lower lumbar spine.

Next week we Continue our series to Happier Hips with the pelvic rim and stability!

SUN SALUTATION FITNESS CHALLENGE 4 THE KIDS

You can put kids in sports. They put themselves in the game…

Karma Yoga offers many teachers and students the opportunity to give back to their community and stay healthy through the asana practice of Yoga & meditation, and this time it’s for the kids.  Between Novemeber 1-7th, Athletics 4 Kids is holding a Fitness Challenge acrossVancouver and BC, and anyone can participate!

Did you know that more than 1/3 of Canadian children cannot participate in sports or recreational activities due to financial barriers? A4K helps raise awareness and funds so that kids can live their dreams and participate in sports, which as we know is fundamental to their development.

The concept behind the challenge is easy; participants sign up with their gym or studio, join a team and choose to tackle a bodyweight workout of 250 – 1000 repetitions based on their personal fitness level. The goal is to finish the exercise as quickly as possible and collect pledges/donations in your community to support your efforts.

This is the 4th year of the Challenge and it has grown by leaps and bounds every year, but we need your help to continue this momentum in order to get the kids in YOUR community off the couch and into the game.

How does Yoga fit into this challenge?

Easy, YogaFORM has hopped on board to teach A Sun Salutation Series at numerous gyms, inVancouver and on theNorthShore and you can participate.

The Sun Salutations will be based on how many you can comfortably perform within a 60min session ~ 250, 500 or 1000 meditative Sun Salutations, you can choose to move through them in a hatha style flow or bring a powerful Vinyasa intention and get your sweat on.

I will be teaching various fun and challenging modifications to this ancient practice of honoring the sun through the dynamic asana sequence Surya Namaskar!

With 3 – 4 classes to choose from throughout the week of November 1st – 7th you can choose to attend one or all of them, join our team and get your pledge on!

The drop in rate for the class will also be donated directly to the A4K Fitness Challenge!

How to join the YogaFORM/ Sarah Jamieson team or register for a class?

Check out my YogaFORM Facebook page for more details on locations and contact information. I you are interested in
participating please comment on our Facebook page or email me at [email protected] and I will send you the karmic details and class A4K Yoga Sun Salutation schedule.

Together we can support kids and their dreams! Let’s get out there and play! Ask your local gym or studio if they are supporting Athletics 4 Kids and get involved!

For more information on A4K visit: www.a4k.ca

For our Team YogaFORM Page visit:  http://www.gifttool.com/athon/OurTeamPage?ID=1731&AID=1666&TID=10689

 

Free Yoga, Great Deals, Fun Times – A Perfect Day of Yoga!

Source: http://www.hardtailforever.com/yoga2009b.htm#

Thanks to Taya for mentioning this week the Fall Open House this Saturday, Oct 22 at Hari Om Yoga in Langley!

As the store manager and someone who has attended the open house many times, I can vouch for what a great day of yoga and yoga community this will be. Not only are the classes free all day (yay!), but Hari Om will be placing much of its yoga wear on special at 15% off! 20 and 50 class cards will be reduced by 10% on Saturday as well.

Hari Om stocks some of your favourite brands in yoga wear, featuring new shipments of Be Present and Hard Tail Forever, two unique brands made in North America.

Come and join a fun day of yoga with us! We will have food and snacks, as well as a great line-up of classes to try – whether you’re new to yoga and want to see what it’s about, or maybe you already know and love the yoga practice and just want to come for the fun of it! Classes are first-come, first-served, so arrive early to reserve your spot!

I’ll be there all day (and teaching Tragically Hips at 3pm!) so drop by and say hello!

Hari Om Yoga is located at #102 – 20230 64 Ave, Langley. For questions, call 604-539-5066 or email [email protected]. See you there!

Class schedule:

9-10am – Yin/Yang

10:30-11:30am – Hot

12:00-1:00pm – Luna

1:30-2:30pm – Yoga for Beginners

3:00-4:00pm – Tragically Hips

4:30-5:30 – Relax Deeply

Laughter Yoga

Laughter yoga was created by Dr. Madan Kataria in 1995 in Mumbai, India.  The idea came to him at a time he was writing an article ‘Laughter- The Best Medicine’.  It originated as a ‘Laughter Club’.  After two weeks of telling the same jokes, the participants became bored.  Dr. Kataria’s wife is a yoga instructor.  He consulted with her in further developing the ‘Laughter Club’.  They discovered that there were a lot of similarities between laughing and pranayama exercises.  Laughter yoga was born, resulting in a blend of Yogic Deep Breathing, Stretching, and Laughter Exercises that cultivate child-like playfulness.  Dr. Kataria came to the realization that the body cannot tell the difference between real and pretend laughter.

I took my very first Laughter Yoga class at Open Door Yoga on Commercial Drive.  I have to say, there were a lot of times when I thought to myself, what the heck am I doing.  However, the laughter was contagious.  I left the class feeling happier and lighter.

Give Laughter Yoga a try.  Go with an open mind and an open heart.

Namaste.

 

 

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...