About Sarah Jamieson

http://www.moveolution.com

Sarah is the owner and head movement coach at Moveolution; a Vancouver based consulting company focused on the integration of movement and recovery science. Bridging the gaps between the clinical and performance fields Sarah’s passion stems from lifelong passion of Yoga, Jujitsu, and Qi Gong; which she integrates into her coaching practice. She is a full time social change maker, a ‘run-a-muker’ of everything outdoors and repeatedly engages in random acts of compassion.

Posts by Sarah Jamieson:

TIME TO TEE OFF: TPI vs. FMS

TIME TO TEE OFF: TPI vs. FMS

Our golf specific 4 part series starts with understanding the scope of prevention and screening techniques widely offered by both medical and fitness professionals. Over the course of the last decade I have worked with more and more golfers who experience similar mechanical breakdowns, whether they are recreational or elite golfers – the corrective component should be an active part of any person’s golf game.

53% of amateur golfers and 30% of professional golfers will play with an injured back or performance hindering injury this year. InAmerica, more than $50 billion is spent annually on back pain-related healthcare costs. Therefore, with stats like these – it pays to invest in proper coaching, and bio mechanical corrective tools, like the TPI and FMS/ SFMA screens. When used together and tailored to the athletes goals, can lead to not only prevention of injury, but advancement on the green.

The TPI Golf Screen is one of the most valuable tools in the toolbox for any golf, fitness, or health professional who works with golfers, even at the recreational level. Both screens can help identify physical limitations that shape a player’s swing and contribute to painful movement.

What’s the difference?

TPI – Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) – the leaders in elite player development. Is a screen to showcase mechanical dysfunctional and breakdowns, related to the measure of risk of injury or poor play specifically in playing golf. There are 13 individual tests within the Level 1 Screen plus additional tests introduced at Level 2 for the wrist, ankle, and neck.

FMSFunctional Movement Screen (FMS) – is a ranking and grading system to showcase mechanical dysfunctions, breakdowns and asymmetries within the fundamental movement patterns performed day to day, and relates that to physical activity. The SFMA (selective functional movement assessment) takes it one step further is closely related to the TPI screen in it’s specificity to breaking down movement even further to better pull out dysfunction.

 

Both aim to sequentially offer corrective intervention techniques for improved overall movement in the client’s chosen sport and daily life.

One way to organize the TPI screen is along the global movement patterns within the SFMA. This structure won’t provide the same level of prioritization as within the FMS, as it is more indepth and used within the clinical setting more so that the gym floor, but we can begin to combine and connect the individual tests using the SFMA Top Tier seven assessments, along with the TPI specific tiered movement pattern assessments.

 

Top “Swingers” for Golf Specific Corrective Intervention:

 

1. Cervical Patterns/ Pelvic Tilt Patterns: making the argument that considering they are both affected by the other (meaning the top and bottom of the spine – when one moves, the other must follow). It makes sense to screen both of these elements. Lower crossed posture (S posture in TPI terminology) with a pelvic restriction, will have a similar effect as a cervical restriction due to the interrelationship of spinal segments. This is extremely common and cannot be over looked.

2. Upper extremity in Postural Alignemnt: 90-90 screen falls into this category along with the 90-90 in golf posture. The 90-90 golf posture test puts more emphasis on shoulder mobility and posterior line in conjunction with the back line, spiral and lateral fascial lines.

3. Multi -Segmental Flexion and Multi-Segmental Extension, as well as Upper Quarter and Lower Quarter Screens: both apply equally. Setting up your physical intention starting out on the tee, you need to be able to differentiate upper and lower extremity to ensure proper follow through and minimize lateral shifting; which directly relates to a reduced mobility and rotation in the hips necessary to power out and connect with the ball. Moreover, the S-posture commonly seen in poor golf mechanics is directly related to these specific assesments.

 

Full TPI Screen (cross over with the FMS and SFMA), consists of the following:

 

  • Pelvic tilt
  • Torso rotation
  • Lower body rotation
  • Overhead deep squat
  • Toe touch
  • 90-90 shoulder and 90-90 shoulder in golf stance
  • Single leg stance
  • Lat length
  • Upper quarter (without and with scapular stabilization)
  • Lower quarter
  • Glute bridge
  • Reach roll and lift
  • Leg lowering
  • Ankle inversion/eversion
  • Wrist (multiplanar)
  • Partial squat/ankle eversion
  • Cervical spine

FMS and SFMA: (Top Tier  Assessments – applicable for golf and integration with the TPI)

  • Cervical Spine Assessment
  • Upper Extremity Movement Pattern Assessments (& Pain Provocation Patterns)
  • Multi-Segmental Flexion & Extension Assessment
  • Mulit-Segmental Rotation Assessment
  • Overhead Deep Squat
  • Single Leg Stance

I would also be inclined to implement the trunk stability and rotary stability depending on the clients overall performance. Much of the swing pattern stems from being able to differentiate upper and lower extremities, rotation at the hips and powering through the trunk with flawless technique. This sequence is key to a golfer’s performance in tee-ing off.

 

Applying Corrective Interventions:

  • If the player is in pain, the first priority is to get them out of pain, much like in the FMS, if they score a “zero” a.k.a feel pain, refer directly to a physiotherapist or golf specific athletic therapist.
  • Address the breakdowns  that are most relevant to the player’s swing pattern. A major concept upon which TPI is built is the body-swing connection. How the player sets up their stance, body positioning in relation to the ball and how the player swings the club is an expression of his or her underlying movement ability or restriction pattern.

 

  • Correct all the failures you can visually see. You can only correct one movement pattern at a time. A big issue we see are clients and coaching programs that become too scattered and it will overhelm the client and most likely your own perscrption. Start with the lowest scored test or largest asymmetry (visual breakdown) and start to clean it up with corrective work off the  green and practical application on the range or on the green. Most often we find when one pattern is cleaned up, they will innately affect the rest of breakdowns (usually for the better). This will give you more of an accurate overall assessment of the clients performance in their swing, chipping, putting etc.

 

  • Have a prioritization scheme within the Screen. It is designed to give you the major movement patterns, but after the first screen, you should start to get a feel for the client’s specific mechanics. If they pass certain tests with flying colors, there is no need to rescreen them every time on that test. I screen clients every quarter on the full screen, but every 4-6 weeks I will screen the prioritized movement patterns, and each session will ensure there is an increase in movement and better performance – this comes from communication and active engagement between myself and my clients golf’s pro.

 

This is part 1 of a 4 part series on golf specific correction and intervention strategies. Next week we will look at the fascial components and tensegrity of the lines associated with the swing. We will also breakdown corrective drills to improve your tee off, based on the balance and integrity of this massive structure – we call our Fascial System.

This will be a great post for those of you who have inconsistent drives, slice the ball or have mobility restrictions in the hip and spine.

Much of the fascial system integration in performance based movement can be found

Birdie Up and Happy Golfing!

 

Sources:

Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCS, Author – Movement and Functional Movement Systems, SMFA – http://graycookmovement.com/

Thomas Myers, – “Tensegrity” Anatomy Trains – http://www.anatomytrains.com/at 

 

AN UNCONVENTIONAL REVIEW: CONSCIOUS COMMUNICATION

AN UNCONVENTIONAL REVIEW: CONSCIOUS COMMUNICATION

Why being normal sucks!….and how embracing the unconventional can help you live a happier, more fulfilled life. This has been the premise of the last 2 weeks on my journey with Cliff Harvey. Ok, so he doesn’t really know… but I have been taking a lot of notes, and since he has been in Vancouver, I am well on my way to what we “mystical, universal… A.D.D holisitic, pro-humanity potential peeps” call “re defining your values and ethos.”

Life and the Universe have a funny way of bringing to us the exact people, places, circumstances, and messages that our souls are calling for at the right time. It could be a phone call from a long-lost friend we’ve been thinking about, a timely financial windfall when we need it most,  a seemingly random meeting at a social event that leads to the perfect job opportunity, or a poignant bumper sticker, or even a facebook photo—the possibilities are endless, and sometimes it is exactly the opposite – for me, a rejection letter from “what I thought was my career path,” needing to re locate and move, and at a cross roads of “WTF do I do now,” and should I choose “ice cream” or “chicken wings and beer” moment – here’s the reality; whatever your “sign” is, get off at the next exit and see where it leads – because an experience is an experience, there is no good or bad, merely our own perception which defines the “experience.”

What if you believed that everything in your life was happening for your greater good?  That you couldn’t go wrong? That even in the face of adversity, the universe was conspiring in your favor? Would this not make it so much easier to just live life, rather than continuing to run the hamster wheel of doubt, expectation and what if’s? Well, hold onto your hats – because if you just sit back and focus on what you want – it does indeed, manifest.

When it comes to synchronicity, life seems to land us in exactly where we need to be – even if it is in a place we are unsure of. No matter what the path, we do have a part to play and the all-important variable that we are in control of is navigated by our own personal moral compass and beliefs.

We have to BELIEVE that our dreams are real. We have to TRUST that anything is possible. We have to KNOW that every little action we take on behalf of our dreams is supported by unseen forces that are working for us and with us. Even when times get tough and all signs point to giving up, we have to dig deeper and find the faith to keep going.

Conscious Communication

Last night I attended the “Effective Conscious Communication” workshop, where his aim is to simply provide insight into why the way we communicate affects our interpersonal relationships and how we can transform that to develop more harmonious, peaceful and compassionate dynamics with others.

Cliff Harvey draws on his 14 years of clinical experience as a mind body coach, and as a naturopathic doctor to show how we can create more harmonious relationships at home at work and in any other area of life with a few simple intentions, tools and exercises. Instinctively, my first thought was… “oh crap, I am currently sitting in a workshop for “people in relationships” … ahem… check please… note to the world… I am still single.”

Cliff’s first few lines included, sometime along the lines – “we are all in relationships, whether it be with our partners, our friends, family, ourselves and the universe. When we learn to be more responsive than reactive we can empower our communication and encourage greater learning and personal growth.  Ergo – perhaps the key indicator for me here is “reactive” and “relationship,” two words if ever asked my response would be… “No, I am not” (insert awkward school girl giggle here).” Ah, yes the universe and it’s magnitude of aligning the stars and planets for all to see.

Intention is a large part of any holistic health modality, hell, it’s a large part of any modality, and life as we know it – or at least it should be, because it is the fuel behind the flame. It ignites the fire from which all else follows. “The intention we take into any communication (or any situation) drastically changes the context of that communication (or situation). Studies have shown that when people are pre-conditioned with negative stimuli they perceive events afterwards negatively. Conversely, when people are pre-conditioned with positive stimuli they will perceive events afterwards in a more positive light.”

Seems easy enough, but how often do we really think, do and act as thus? It seems to me, that as a human species we seem to focus on the bad, the what isn’t going right, or what we don’t want – rather than the experience is just an experience, it is neither good nor bad – it just is. If we choose to focus our intention on what we do want, and we visualize it as thus – we can and do bring about that change for the better.

Cliff brings up to very key points and that is the idea of trust and intention – Trusting ourselves and trusting others; which is no easy feat, but it is the foundation from which all else is built. It really boils down to self care and compassion for ourselves and for others. Focus on the intention of non0judging, loving compassion and simply receiving what each other are saying without judgement, and in the words of Philo… “Be Kind, for everyone is fighting a great battle.”

When we tune in to the synchronicity of life, when we look with the eyes of trusting in that intention and listen with the ears of and touch of compassion, we begin to experience the undeniable truth that we are all connected, that there is rhyme and reason to the way life flows, and that each and every one of us is accounted for. We begin to know without a doubt that we ALL have something special and unique to offer the world.

During the Q&A portion of the interactive dialogue, I realized that we were all there for various reasons – but our vision was the same, and that was to not merely “improve our communication” skills or “improve relationships,” but to CONNECT and in connecting and listening to others, we innately begin to break down our own barriers and realize that the path each of us are traveling may be the more challenging one, they may have setbacks, but the road less travelled, is the one worth setting forth your quest on.

One of the workshop participant’s, Lynne Laporte a triathlon coach, had this to say about the workshop and experience;

“the workshop is was really cool. Honestly it’s so hard to put into words because it was one of those things where the content itself was interesting but what I got out of it the most was the group experience. It was a workshop that was less context focused and more Interaction driven. In that even if you didn’t “learn” anything new, the context in which the information was shared was what I took away the most!”

The group discussion and sharing was key to the evenings success.

“Experience the breakthrough of realising your power to choose your life of passion and purpose! Live the S**T out of life! “

Next Work Shop –

Choosing You! How to connect to your life of passion and purpose and achieve the goals that really matter

Date: June 3rd

Time: 9am – 6pm

Location: Tides Canada, Hollyhock Room

Price: $199.00

Sources:

Cliff Harvey – http://www.cliffharvey.com/

Lynne Laporte – Enhanced Performance (http://enhancedperformance.ca/)  Switching Gears – (www.switchinggearstriclub.com)

INSPIRATION MEETS PERSPIRATION

INSPIRATION MEETS PERSPIRATION

Harnessing the power behind the mind-body connection or as us nerd-folk call it – The biopsychosocial model (abbreviated “BPS”).

Each day is a new day to harness the power of our own unique potential.  Learning to use your thoughts to positively influence some of your body’s physical responses, thereby decreasing stress, is merely one way to support your personal exploration of your best self. Research has shown that when we imagine an experience, we often have similar mental and physical responses to those you have when the event actually happens. Why? Because we have a vested interest in that connection. From a physiological perspective, our muscles have memory and thus, patterns can be built up, broken down and transformed.

Today’s post is about appreciating the mind-body connection through the art of visual representation and linking that connection to two of my favorite “meditative pass times;” which are running (leading with an active lifestyle) and yoga (mind and body meditation).

Enjoy and Namaste!

Life - it's pretty simple and that grand.

Go beyond your comfort zone.

 

The will to act. deeds, not words.

 

 

 

love rules all

 

 

There are no limitations, only a limited view.

 

Be Yourself!

 

Purpose - is here and now

 

 

IS YOUR FASCIA HYDRATED?  H2O TO GO

IS YOUR FASCIA HYDRATED? H2O TO GO

“No Body Likes a “Crampy”… I mean “Crabby” Athlete! Your hydration levels may be the culprit of your poor performance, and let’s be honest, if you’re feeling more than just muscle cramps (perhaps mental cramps) and poor perforamce; drink more water so you can go the ultra distance.”

As an ultra runner, I have been prone to injuries from time to time – wait… what am I saying. Okay, as an ultra runner I have pretty much had EVERY injury and this year has been no exception.

So why do I run? Because the feeling of accomplishment, of all those long hours running at the crack of dawn when the city is silent, the endless and countless miles clocked, and more importantly, the insurmountable, evolutionary personal changes, maybe a better word would be – epiphany – makes it all worth it. For me, it’s about the choice to run, when others cannot or do not have that choice – it truly that simple.

Last week I suffered intense abdominal pain; which is unnatural for me as a clean eater and for the most part I live a gluten free lifestyle, almost vegan (primarily out of the convenience of “I don’t cook” and prepare quick meals). As it turns out, this abdominal pain was an intestinal blockage (I know, I know… highly attractive), but one contributor to this was dehydration, but rather than “muscle dehydration,” my body had “organ dehydration.” Which means because of the amount I am currently running, training etc – my water intake has not been enough to sustain proper efficiency and even though I drink a lot of fluids – it ain’t enough and hasn’t been for some time.  Combine this with the high stress, of my second ultra event on May 20th “Walk In Her Shoes for CARE Canada, an event I am also organizing single handedly – I guess you could call  it a stressor… but I love it… but my innerds are a little agro. And looking back, my muscles have been “crampy” primarily in the calves and hamstrings a little more than usual.

Why do we Cramp?

Many endurance will experience muscle cramps at some point during their training or racing. An article that outlines this on going discussion very well is from “Utra Fitness” online where they look at the differing theories of where cramping comes from (in simplest terms).  Their findings can be broken down into 3 pillars; however, I am narrowing my scope to reflect and comment on the first two;

  1. Dehydration and electrolyte depletion
  2. Abnormal spinal reflex activity
  3. Carbohydrate depletion

“Using a definition from Dr. Martin Schwellnus a cramp is “a painful, spasmodic, involuntary contraction of skeletal muscle that occurs during or immediately after exercise”(1). While most athletes understand what a cramp feels like there is much confusion as to what causes cramps and how they can be prevented. “ (ultrafitness)

In the 1930s a theory was put forth that dehydration and electrolyte depletion were the primary causes of cramps. This is still a popular theory that has come under fire recently and how does that relate to post running??? Since my pain was associated post run (actually a week after my last long run of 52km)?

The article goes on to say that Schwellnus and Noakes , put forth the new theory that abnormal spinal reflex activity could be the real culprit behind muscle cramps. This theory is built on the understanding of muscle fatigue leading to abnormal functioning at the spinal level of the muscle contraction mechanism; which causes the muscle cramping during activity.

Review of anatomy 101, receptors called muscle spindles cause muscles to contract when they are stretched; while other receptors called Golgi tendon organs (GTO) cause muscles to relax when they are contracted. Both types of receptors are needed to help protect muscles from over-stretching and over-contracting, respectively. These receptors act on muscles by sending an electric signal to the appropriate motor neuron, which is located in the spine, and as we know the fascia assists with all of these responses.

During a normal contraction, signals from both receptors are in balance. According to the theory, when a muscle fatigues the activity of the muscle spindles increases (causing a contraction) and the Golgi tendon organ activity is inhibited (no relaxing) leading to muscle cramping.

Looking at these two theories; I would say that both hold a high degree of merit and (in my opinion) there is no dichotomy between the two. I would say they both contribute to cramping during and after a competition requiring a high degree of volume and/or endurance.  Let’s take a look at fascia and hydration and also the tensigrity of the fascia itself as a contributor for cramping.

H2O To Go, Your Fasica & Hydration:

Ergo, a great opportunity to revisit the fascial system and integration of the above…

The fascia is our body’s protector. We also know that at the microscopic level, the fascial make up resembles that of micro tubules that acts as a transfer/communication highway to move nutrients and transmit nerves impulses to and around the body. The nerves themselves, along with blood vessels run through the fascia. Therefore, if the connective tissue is tight, the associated tissues will have poor nutrient exchange.

In times of stress, and high volumes of load, along with what we are here today to discuss – dehydration, this exacerbates the situation because toxic metabolic waste products build up which will further aggravate pain receptors and reduce proper transfer. Needless to say, this can create a mechanical breakdown and a vicious cycle that undoubtedly creates more muscle tension, leading to further thickening and hardening of the fascia, which will further limit mobility and performance!

One important fact to note is that the fascia holds imprints of our posture and even old injuries, which is one reason why older injuries can still affect present day overall functions and/or re surface at a later date. The fascia (amongst other systems) dictates our shape and freedom of movement.

Are you Tense?

Fascia thickens and hardens where there is chronic tension. Chronic tension can then lead to joint restrictions, movement impairments, pain, decreased performance and/or cramping and twitching.  Manual physicians; (ie. Chiropractors, Physical Therapists, Osteopaths, Acupuncturists and other non-physicians) can manipulate the fascial ‘networks’ in a variety of ways, either directly or indirectly. This is done by breaking up fascial binding and tone of the tissue, as well as re patterning and “waking up” the parasympathetic system. Also very important in recovery and rehabilitation.

I know from personal experience, there is no way I could fully operate as an ultra-runner without regular tune ups from my health team. There are certain things we cannot do on our own; which us why an integrated support team is essential. For more info on my health team please see under sources.

Fascia is composed mainly of collagen fibers, together with water and other proteins which provide a glue-like quality. Due to the regular alignment of the fibers, fascia often has a crystal-like appearance. The connective tissue fibers extend deep in between individual muscle cells and between practically all cells of the body. Fascia tends dry out as we age, becoming stiff and tight. Proper hydration, vitamins, minerals and overall nutrition assist with the rehydration and overall health of the fascial network.  Regular movement of the fascia through exercise and mobilization helps to greatly reduce the fascia from stiffening and ultimately effecting performance.

The Hydration Study:

The Fascia Research Group , is part of the Division of Neurophysiology, of Ulm University, Germany say that,

‘When fascia is being stretched, water is being extruded from the ground substance and simultaneously there are some temporary relaxation changes in the longitudinal arrangement of the collagen fibers. When the stretch is finished, the longitudinal relaxation of the fibers takes a few minutes to revert (provided the strain has not been too strong and there have been no micro-injuries); yet the water continues to be soaked up into the tissue, to the degree that the tissue even swells and becomes stiffer than before.’

So, how important is recovery and rehydration? I would say very! During the recovery period of the elongated tissue (minutes, even hours after), a gradual re hydration of the muscle should be expected; which is also in conjunction with the balance of the tissue through a gradual regaining of the initial tissue stiffness.  Active loading and subsequent rest in proportion to each-other will achieve the desired outcome.

Dehydration as little as 2% of body weight can begin to significantly impact performance. For an athlete that has a higher sweat rate (greater than 2 liter per hour), that level of dehydration can occur after 30 minutes of exercise in hot and humid conditions. Additional, research has shown that level of dehydration can slow 10-km run times by 6.3% compared to running in a hydrated state. That equates to a race time almost 3 minutes slower if you usually run a 40-minute 10k!

This of course depends specifically on someone’s unique mechanics and factoring in muscle fibre composition, sport they engage in will affect muscle tissue response etc etc, and as we have seen above – stretching as well.

Yin to Your Yang:

Passive stretching and Yin Yoga stretches can load the tissue and fascial lines in a way that induces a temporary decrease in tissue water content; which has been shown to contribute to alterations in tissue stiffness; however, this is to be expected with any load placed upon the tissue. When the tissue is in a state of elongation the question then becomes; how long will the tissue remain in elongation, as well as how important is rehydration recovery.

Conclusion:

The key factors in this article today are to ensure that you are aware of your personal mechanics and body responses during, before and after your training. If you decide to venture into the realm of ultra-distance athletics, take the time to understand the force applied and the necessary nutrients your body will need to sustain you, not only during the performance, but the months and weeks (sometimes even years) leading up to your goal. My greatest lesson learned is to never underestimate the power of the body and the will and drive to succeed. In all the chaos of the last 2 weeks, I forgot to listen to my body and even though during the taper, we decrease our mileage – it is an essential time to get our bodies ready by recovery, resting and fine tuning the mental and emotional aspects of our journey.

If you are unsure of how much water your mechanics need – ask a professional. Also, keep in mind electrolyte balance is essential as well. I always make sure to have at least 2 options with me at all times. Eboost; which is a special blend of active vitamins and minerals focuses on 3 vital elements of the athletes super world (endurance, immunity and recovery).

The Key Ingredients of Eboost:

For ENDURANCE: Glucuronolactone, Chromium, Vitamin B12, and Anhydrous Caffeine For RECOVERY: Minerals (including potassium and sodium for electrolyte replacement), and essentials vitamins including Vitamin C For IMMUNITY: Vitamin C, Zinc, Selenium and Copper. You really can’t go wrong, and super tasty (Pink Lemonade, is my fav).

I also put a few drops of Elete Electrolytes, provide balanced ions of magnesium, potassium, sodium and chloride, just a few drops in your water and you are ready to rock. Happy running!

Nourish the body and the soul will grow.

 

Sources:

Health Team:

CLIFF HARVEY VANCITY WORKSHOPS : “Live The S**T Out Of Life!”

CLIFF HARVEY VANCITY WORKSHOPS : “Live The S**T Out Of Life!”

Cliff Harvey (ND, Dip.Fit, HbT, Adv.Psych-K, Reiki lll) is a Naturopath, author and speaker specialising in holistic performance nutrition and mind-body-spirit medicine. He teaches people how to give themselves the chemical building blocks of health (great nutrition) and how to integrate new patterns of behaviour and actions to achieve their life, health and performance goals.

YogaFORM is pleased to support Cliff, combining personal growth with Yoga is a “no-brainer,” therefore; we thought it would be “neat-o” to offer Cliff’s attendees YogaFORM prior to his workshop!

Join us May 18th at the “Women Empowered” kick off event at Denman Cinemas, as Cliff makes is debut as my special guest at our event. If you didn’t know –  Cliff is also my Health Sponsor for the CARE Canada “Walk In Her Shoes” 101km Event in Vancouver, that I am currently gearing up for on May 20th. He will be attending and signing his best selling book “Time Rich Cash Optional.” Check us out!

 

UPCOMING WORKSHOPS IN VANCITY:

 

Effective Conscious Communication

Date: Thursday, May 24th, 2012

Time: 6:30pm

Location: Tides Canada – 400-163 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

BONUS: Coffee, tea and refreshments provided

Details:

In this workshop Cliff Harvey ND draws on his 14 years of clinical experience as a Naturopath and Mind-Body Therapist to show how we can create more harmonious relationships at home, at work and in any other area of life – with just a few simple intentions, tools and exercises.

You will learn:

  • The value of having Brave Conversations
  • The importance of speaking your truth
  • How to use positive framing to literally transform your relationships
  • How to create better rapport
  • How to create more mindful communication
  • A simple mindfulness exercise to reconnect to your calm centre

Additionally Cliff will outline his 4 Key Communication Skills and demonstrate a simple, effective exercises that will allow anyone, in any relationship to communicate more effectively. (Learning this simple exercise is worth the price of the workshop alone!)

 

Fight Nutrition 101: No BS Nutrition for Fighters

Date: Saturday May 26th

Time: 10am – 12pm

Location: Universal North Vancouver

Details:

In this workshop Cliff Harvey draws on over 14 years helping fighters to train and compete at their best. He has been called ‘the King of the Cut’ for his work helping fighters to make weight and enter the ring or cage in optimal condition and fuelled to fight.

Why you need to make a commitment to be a better athlete…not just a better fighter, and how you can be leaner, more effectively fuelled, and recover better year round.

You will learn:

  • Cliff’s unique 12 phase approach to eating to be leaner and more effectively fuelled year round, and before a fight
  • 5 Golden Rules for Meal Composition
  • How to optimise pre, during, and post-training nutrition
  • The safest and most effective methods for cutting weight before your fight

Living the S**t Out of Life! (An intro to Time Rich Cash Optional)

Date: Tuesday, May 29th, 2012

Time: 6:30pm

Location: TBC

 

Details:

Intro to living time rich, happy and free.

(Consists of talk, followed by discussion.)

 

Based on the concepts in Cliff Harvey’s best-selling book Time Rich Cash Optional: an unconventional guide to happiness.

In this talk Cliff discusses why we simply have to change the way we live and the way we treat each other, for our own health and sanity and for that of the planet.

Cliff challenges the audience to live a life of simple abundance; embrace the unconventional; and begin to spend the currency of our lives (TIME!) on things that make us happier, healthier and that improve the lives of those around us.

Be inspired, motivated and uplifted.

 

Choosing You! Connecting with your life of purpose and reaching the goals that really matter!

[Full Day Workshop]

Date: Sunday June 3rd, 2012

Time: 9:00am 6:00pm

Location: Tides Canada – 400-163 West Hastings Street, Vancouver

BONUS: Coffee, tea, refreshments and fresh fruit will be provided. Bring your Yoga mat as we the workshop will be starting off with a 20min YogaFORM Vinyasa Yoga Class to get you energized and invigorated to start off your full day of “Choosing You!”

Details:

The exercises in this inspiring, motivational and practical weekend workshop have helped thousands around the world live happier, more fulfilled lives.

You will learn:

Why being normal sucks!….and how embracing the unconventional can help you live a happier, more fulfilled life
The value of dissatisfaction and how you can use this to transform your relationship with your life
– How to identify your value set and ethos, so that you can set the goals that really matter!
– How to turn your dreams into realisable goals
The importance of mindfulness for realising and achieving your goals

Cliff will also show how you can turn negative and self limiting beliefs into positive behaviours and patterns to defeat self sabotage, and will outline his unique approach to daily intention, actions and audits so that you can stay on track!

This workshop includes practical exercises encouraging greater mindfulness, awareness and communication.

Experience the breakthrough of realising your power to choose your life of passion and purpose!
Live the S**T out of life!

FOR MORE INFO ON REGISTRATION FOLLOW THIS LINK: http://www.eventbrite.co.nz/org/2144794195?s=7951665

Cliff Harvey –  http://www.cliffharvey.com/home

“WOMEN EMPOWERED:” ON MAY 18TH & 20TH STAND IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE WORLD’S WOMEN

“WOMEN EMPOWERED:” ON MAY 18TH & 20TH STAND IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE WORLD’S WOMEN

“WALK IN HER SHOES NATIONAL CAMPAIGN” IN VANCOUVER – STANDS IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE WORLD’S WOMEN 

 

Are you walking on May 20th?

Vancouver – ” Walk In Her Shoes Campaign” team leader and founder of RUN4ACAUSE pledges to” Run 101km in Her Shoes” on May 20th 2012, supporting of CARE Canada.

To help break the cycle of poverty and in celebration of 101 years of the world’s women; Sarah Jamieson, a local coach, athlete and philanthropist has organized two main events to showcase the power behind women, benefiting CARE Canada. TheseVancouver  events include:

“WALK IN HER SHOES” 101KM VANCOUVER EVENT:

In the poorest communities around the world, women and girls are often the ones tasked to collect water, firewood or other basic necessities of life. They walk on average 6 kms a day (approximately 8,000 steps) while carrying the equivalent of a suitcase. This leaves little time to attend school, access health services or earn money to support their families. This is repeated several times in a day.

The Walk In Her Shoes Vancouver Event,  is part of the CARE Canada 4 month national campaign “Walk In Her Shoes” that kicked off on March 8th, (International Women’s Day). The 101lkm route is broken down into 8 legs/districts with 6km to18km walk/run distances markers to choose from, and Sarah is asking Vancouverites to join her and walk or run 6km or more with her on May 20th.

START LOCATION: North Shore Athletics. FINISH LOCATION: Terry Fox Memorial Downtown.

Sarah’s goal is to run 101km in one day (under 14 hours) and raise $20,000.00 in support of CARE Canada’s key projects empowering women and girls, and to bring to light the importance behind girl’s education, and the impact girl’s play in their communities. Moreover, to showcase the potential WE, as a community have towards investing in the world’s most untapped resource – women.

To bring the understanding of women home – the last 10km (91km-101km) is dedicated to, and in honor of the women on the DTES (downtown eastside). Paying tribute to the missing women that have fallen victim to sexually bansed violence, as well as to those who continue to fight for those who no longer have a voice.

“WOMEN EMPOWERED” MOVIE & SALON CONVERSATION EVENT:

On Friday May 18th, join Vancouver for this one-night screening of  “Women Empowered” & salon conversation, a pre warm up event to Vancouver’s ”Walk In Her Shoes 101km. Created in partnership with CARE and the acclaimed social documentary photographer and TED.com speaker, Phil Borges. These films chronicle 4 short vignettes (approx. 15mins each), 4 stories of 4 women, remote and mostly unknown, on the vanguard of a global shift toward gender equality. Let us take you on a journey toIndia,Peru,Africa,Ethiopia andCanada, as we showcase the power behind girls education, maternal and child health, economic empowerment and defending dignity.

Conversation is an integral part of any event; therefore, the Women Empowered” event will also include a speaker panel thematically chosen to introduce each vignette, and touch on the powerful message behind the documentary. This style is representative of a salon conversation experience, as it inspires authentic and organic conversation between the audience and speakers. After the intermission, the audience will be offered a chance to ask questions and offer feedback.

Global Panelists:

  • Aliya Dossa – Introducing “Learning to Lead.” 18 year old [email protected] Speaker, Co Founder of Youth4Tap.
  • Alexandra Borys– Introducing “Vigilantes De La Vida.” M.A Int. Relations, Project Analyst for Colliers Int.
  • Jessica Robson – Introducing “Strength in Numbers.” Leadership Director for lululemon athletica
  • Sapna Dayal – Introducing “Abay’s Return.” Executive Director of imagine1day

Local Panelists:

  • Janet Kreda – Sustainability & Community Planning for Metro Vancouver, Philanthropist
  • Loretta Cella – Executive Program Director and Founder of Passion Foundation.
  • Jordan Bower – The Man Who Walked from Vancouver to Mexico

Special Guest: Cliff Harvey, Author of ‘Choosing You!’ & Time Rich Cash Optional; Speaker, Naturopath, Philosopher, Raconteur.

“Urban Sustainability Silent Auction”, Door Prizes & Exhibit: The lobby gives rise to an exceptional space for networking and will feature a unique and authentic take on the silent auctions.

JOIN THE RUN AND REGISTER HERE:

Taking part is easy, click on Registration is and join or pledge your support! Sign up Now!  Join “PB” & JAMS: RUN4ACAUSE or create your own team if you wish and get involved in supporting the worlds women.

DISTRICT SPONSORS:

 

EVENT SPONSORS & SUPPORTERS:

Fitness Town.     Passion Foundation.    lululemon athletica & A Little More Good. Imagine1day.     Fit to Train Human Performance Systems Inc & YogaFORM.      Scott Robarts Photography.      Miriam Borys, B.Ed, Chef.    Buddha-Full Juice & Smoothies.    [email protected]Jeff Gibbs – Human Earth Photography.

STAY INVOLVED:

Follow us on facebook at our Event Page here:

Women Empowered and Walk In Her Shoes Vancouver Event

Tweet it up and Follow our Campaign at @SarahMJamieson #WIHS

 

NEED A TUNE UP:  “Are Your Fascial Transmissions Strained?”

NEED A TUNE UP: “Are Your Fascial Transmissions Strained?”

Structural Integration has been a growing interest in North America. It’s roots stem from European descent; an evolutionary brain child of the fascial work seen in Dr Ida Rolf, the movement insights of Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais and the whole-systems geometry of  B. Fuller and many other influences.  Amongst, those influenced is the widely known works of Tom Myers and Chris Federick.

It should be duly notes that Myers;  started KMI (Kinesis Myofascial Integration) which continues to explore Structural Integration from the point of view of myofascial continuities.

In many articles we have taken a close look at the neuromyofascial web; the matrix provides a sliding and gliding environment for muscles, suspends organs into the abyss that is our body, and transmits nutrients and information for movement from muscle to bone – it is the “Queen bee” of our very organic structure – otherwise known as the human body. This flexible structure is able to resist great unidirectional tension forces until the wavy pattern of fibers has been straightened out by the pulling force.

Figure 1a

YogaFORM “Surprising Differences in the Fascial Strain Transmissions:”

Earlier this week on my YogaFORM facebook page I posted the photo seen in figure 1a “Surprising differences in the fascial strain transmissions,;“ to bring to light the importance of movement and the associated relationships with reciprocal movement patterns.

Using the the ASLR (active straight leg raise) shown here; as an example of this ongoing exploratory conversation piece.  The ASLR exercise is one of the 7 screening tests corrective movement coaches apply using the FMS screen.  It tests the ability to disassociate the lower extremity while maintaining stability in the trunk.  By assessing active hamstring and gastroc-soleus flexibility, we also look at how the client reacts to maintain a stable pelvis , as well as active extension of the opposite leg . It is important to note that the hamstrings and the pelvis have a high correlation together in the toe touch and the ASLR.

Taking into account the “flexibility, tensegrity and tone” of the hamstring, but also the reciprocal action of the opposite hip flexor group, as well as the lumbar and thoracolumbar fascia. This cross over affect supports bipedal motion.

“The word ‘tensegrity’ is an invention: a contraction of ‘tensional integrity.’ Tensegrity describes a structural-relationship principle in which structural shape is guaranteed by the finitely closed, comprehensively continuous, tensional behaviors of the system and not by the discontinuous and exclusively local compression member behaviors. Tensegrity provides the ability to yield increasingly without ultimately breaking or coming asunder.” – Buckminster Fuller

Sherri Leigh Iwaschuk, a renowned and well known RMT and KMI therapist/coach/movement guru/ – pick a label and she will successfully dominate any one of them; posed a great addition to our facebook YogaFORM chat .  Sherri’s commentary, “It’s also worthwhile to note that contraction of the gluteus maximus might result in as much as 85% of the force transfer to the fascia latae, leaving only 15% to the femur, etc. This is a beautiful example of how muscles attach not only to bone (periosteum) but also to fascia and other muscles; laterally and even all the way to their antagonists. (Huijing)”

Sherri’s observation is correct, even in this picture there are only a few examples of the fascia strain transmissions to assoicated muscles, but not all are mentioned. The glutes, ITB TFL, even going as far as the latissimus dorsi and it’s points of attachement to the T7 – L5 of the spinal column, as well as the thoracolumbar fascia, iliac creast and inferior ribs and it’s innervation of the 6th, 7th and 8th cervical nerves. We can even go further down the rabbit hole and then discuss the relationship and direct impact of spinal structure in this specific case of the ASLR – but I will leave it here for now!

Potential Connections with the Role of Fascia and Overuse Musculoskeletal Disorders:

Tensegrity  plays a large role in structural integration and corrective movement, as it helps to explain the instantaneous transmission of fascial strain forces against or working with associated patterns.  Peripheral or secondary effects, can be  noted in many cases of somatic trauma or overuse of muscle, fascia and the related breakdown of the systems (reduced recovery, poor re hydration and energy adaptations etc). On average, the neutral tensegrity has balanced tensional forces and  can be noted as a stable and low-energy consuming structure at the molecular level, but when strained the structure can become rigid and inefficient; which is due to pre stressing along one or more of the associated lines of forces. This reduces the adaptively of the involved tissue and can alter the movement itself – thus establishing abnormal lines of force. Furthermore, this then can lead to hypertonicity and/or hypotonicity and imbalanced movement.

Needless to say that when overused muscles, in sport or even at the “corporate” level with hours upon hours of seated, seated and more seated movement can change the  adaptability of the involved tissue, creating abnormal lines of tension in contiguous structures, that is unstable and high-energy consuming at the molecular level.

Conclusion of this conversation is that there are many factors that apply to any one movement, because movement is a sequence of reflex, reactionary processes, where there can be no isolation of one particular muscle or group of muscles. In the action of the ASLR we can see that it is a delicate balance of not only tension, force and release but also a balance of mobility and stability necessary for proper movement and activation of the lines to collectively transfer energy to all the parts that make up the sum of the whole.

Taking a closer look at the ASLR progression we need to consider mobility before stability. Improving the overall flexibility of the assoicated muscles, fascia etc, involved is our starting point. Dysfunction in motor control tends to be one of the most common causes for altered neuromuscular stabilization of the pelvis and hips. Therefore, when performing the ASLR or any movement pattern for that matter – keep the transmission strains and transfer of force in mind to the surrounding muscles groups, joints and fascia lines.

For more information on KMI:

As noted in Sherri’s informational segway via her website… “The design of KMI is to unwind the strain patterns residing in your body’s locomotors system, restoring it to its natural balance, alignment, length, and ease. Common strain patterns come about from inefficient movement habits, and our body’s response to poorly designed cars, desks, telephones, and airplanes, etc. Individual strain patterns come from imitation when we are young, from the invasions of injury or surgery or birth, and from our body’s response to traumatic episodes. Beginning as a simple gesture of response, movements can become a neuromuscular habit.” I could not put this into better words myself!

Sources:

 

BARE ALL BAREFOOT PART 4: PERFORM BETTER & BE “PARASYMPATHETIC” TO YOUR FEET

BARE ALL BAREFOOT PART 4: PERFORM BETTER & BE “PARASYMPATHETIC” TO YOUR FEET

For the past week and a half I have been re-experiencing the same physical breakdowns that have plagued my ultra running for nearly 2 years. These include:

  • Left hip hike (also known as lumbo-pelvic dysfunction)
  • Left side – minor referral in the SI Joint and glutes
  • Left  side- dislocation of T2, T8 and T10
  • Right side – Medial  “Soreness” around the right knee
  • Right minor “plantar fascitis”

Aka – a whole set of awesomeness. Now, reviewing many of my earlier posts, does this not sound a lot like breakdowns in the spiral line; which many runners and ultra linear athletes fall victim to. Most of us tend to go directly to the source of our pain, and for me this has always been the left side of my low back  everything else is really just along for the ride. However, when we follow the line itself we can see that all of these “symptoms” are merely just that – referral and energy blocked area of the larger scope of the issue; which is instability of the pelvis due to improper foot placement when running.

FACT – I am a heel striker! There I have said it, my skeleton is out of the closet. Another confession, I pitch forward and forward head carrier. You now know all my secrets. This brings me to my next food for thought on the runners list of recovery and preparation – manual therapy. I am a big advocate of RMT and FST, as it allows us A-types to chill out, focus on proper parasympathetic integration and connective tissue work to passively (but actively) break up binding in the areas of blocked energy.

Be “Parasympathetic” to Promote Whole Body Recovery:

On Friday, I had the opportunity to hop on Gael Bishop’s massage table and within minutes was literally feeling those areas unbind and release. An integrated approach to health and wellness, as well as, performance enhancement is key to any persiodized program.

How can RMT and FST assist with recovery and prepare the tissue for your next phase in training? Moreover, What general effects does massage have on the parasympathetic and sympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system?

“The purpose of massage therapy is to prevent, develop, maintain, rehabilitate or augment physical function or relieve pain (Massage Therapy Act, 1991). Massage Therapy is recognized as one of the oldest methods of healing, with references in medical texts nearly 4,000 years old. It is a widely accepted and effective treatment for reducing stress, decreasing muscle pain and stiffness, and for aiding in rehabilitation and postural realignment.” This little snippet of a excerpt was taken directly from Gael Bishop’s website.

Gael has been in the fitness industry for over 18 years and continues to inspire her clients to achieve their goals.  Her experience as a Personal Trainer, Group Fitness Instructor and Registered Massage Therapist places her clients in very good hands.  Gael is committed to teaching her clients to “Trust Their Strength”, learn about their bodies and discover a new level of health and well being.

The human body is a finely tuned interaction of organs and systems. “the close inter-relationship between the somatic, autonomic and endocrine systems makes it impossible for pathologic changes to take place in any one structure without causing adaptive changes in other structures.” Edner, quoted in Chaitow (1983).

The Autonomic Nervous System is a system of nerves and ganglia that act as an interconnected web or “communication highway” with the distribution and reception of predominantly involuntary impulses to the heart (beat and contractile force) smooth muscle (vasoconstriction or dilation of arterioles) and glands (increasing or decreasing their secretion).

It can further explained by looking and the two sub-divisions – the sympathetic and the parasympathetic systems. While the sympathetic nervous system serves all parts of the body, the parasympathetic Nervous System is confined to the head and trunk.

Generally associated with the fight/flight response by its role in sedating the body and restoring it to the resting state it was in prior to sympathetic stimulation, where the ANS is a modifier of activity; either increasing or decreasing movement to respond to external and environmental stimuli.

Massage stimulates the sensory and proprioceptive nerve fibres of the skin and underlying tissues, and that these messages pass along the afferent fibres to the spinal chord, producing various effects in any zones supplied from the same segment of the spinal chord. … Such reactions are called reflex effects. When we take into account the make-up of the fascial system, an interconnected matrix which resemble, at the microscopic level, mini tubules that send nutrients and transmit nerve impulses to every aspect of the human body and every system; therefore, the benefits of massage are great. It can not only produce a local effect but may can establish a soothing effect on the body as a whole; as it can increase the sympathetic response.

Massage also may cause vasodilation in the skin and muscles by stimulating receptors of the sympathetic nervous system. Deep tissue massage often leads to a sense of relief and peace during or after the event – even if some of the deep tissue work is painful at the time of treatment. If we (as the client) also focus on linking this treatment with deep breathing – the brain can then be signaled to secrete the necessary hormones necessary to relax tissue even further, which aids in recovery and relaxation.

“Painful, stressful, and emotional experiences all cause changes in hypothalamic activity. In turn, the hypothalamus controls the autonomic nervous system and regulates body temperature, thirst, hunger, sexual behavior, and defensive reactions such as fear and rage.” (Tortora and Grabowski, 1996). Therefore; it is also safe to say that the parasympathetic system is integral to maintain “being chilled out,” as many athletes tend to be very “A-Type” keeping our muscles in tune with our response systems will aid in all aspects of our performance and phases in training.

“Back’ Tracking to the LPHC:

Taking a quick review of my own personal physical stress, the lumbo-pelvic complex. THE lumbo-pelvic-hip complex (LPHC) is a region of the body that has a massive influence on the structures above and below it. The LPHC has between 29 and 35 muscles that attach to the lumbar spine or pelvis (1,2). Above the LPHC are the thoracic and cervical spine, rib cage, scapula, humerus, and clavicle. These structures make up the thoracolumbar and cervicothoracic junctions of the spine, the scapulothoracic, glenohumeral, acromioclavicular (AC), and sternoclavicular (SC) joints. Remembering back to our 4 part series “Shouldering Responsibility,” we identified that the shoulder is not solely comprised of just the glenohumeral joint, but there are 4 joints to consider.

The LPHC is directly associated with both the lower extremities and upper extremities of the body; which is why promoting the relationship that exists between the hips and the shoulders is important to note. Because of this relationship and dysfunction of both the lower extremities and upper extremities can lead to dysfunction of the LPHC and vice versa. In the LPHC region specifically, the femur and the pelvis make up the iliofemoral joint and the pelvis and sacrum make up the sacroiliac joint. With runners, and improper gait cycles, the femoral head of the femur can literally jam the hip socket and compress the joint, shortening the leg and adding compression to all the lower limb joints (hip, ankle and knee).

Collectively, these structures anchor many of the major myofascial tissues that have a functional impact on the arthrokinematics of the structures above and below them. It is no wonder that there can be no isolation of one area to soothe the pain associated with biomechanical breakdown – it is a series or sequence of release and corrective control needed to effectively “treat” my “so-called” injury. RMT and FST sessions is an integral part of recovery days and during my peak training (especially gearing up for a 101km ultra run in late May).

Connecting the Nervous System to our Feet:

One branch of the nerves found in the feet stems from the largest nerve in our body, the sciatic nerve. Hence, the importance of your peids and the appreciation of the force and loud we apply on our feet per day. We know that the hands and feet house the majority of our bone structure. Our feet come with 26 tiny bones and last week we looked at the integration of the arch (plantar fascia) and the Achilles Tendon; which act as springs in our body to effectively distribute energy and loud through human locomotion.

The sciatic nerve consists of two nerves, the tibial and the common peroneal. These nerves are tied together by connective tissue and the wonderful adaptability of our fascial systems (primarily connected to the spiral line in the case of my LPHC). The sciatic nerve sends its two branches down the leg into the foot. In the foot these nerves branch out again, with many divisions nourishing the entire area. Thus the importance of regular manual therapy on the posterior and spiral lines are integral to optimal functioning and performance output for any athlete with similar symptoms of bio mechanical breakdowns. Add in a little traction – and as they say “Bob’s your Uncle” (Bob actually is my uncle so I can this without generalizing all the Bob’s out there.”

More than Just a Reflex: “Reflexology”

If you are an athlete, make sure to ask your RMT or FTS therapist to treat the feet, or even add in Reflexology; the trigger points in the feet can also aid in more than just “muscle and tissue” release, but in identifying the areas of pain that are usually associated with organs and areas of other discomfort in the body. Hence why all these manual therapies are important at one time or another, much like our bodies, there is no isolation of one being better than the other. A unifying theme is the idea that areas on the foot correspond to areas of the body, and that by manipulating these one can improve health through one’s qi.

Around the world and throughout history, reflexology has been rediscovered time and time again. Archeological evidence points to ancient reflexology medical practices in Egypt(2330 BCE), China(2704 BCE) and Japan (690 CE). Reflexology is an alternative medicine involving the physical act of applying pressure to the feet, hands, or ears with specific thumb, finger, and hand techniques without the use of oil or lotion. It is based on what reflexologists claim to be a system of zones and reflex areas that they say reflect an image of the body on the feet and hands, with the premise that such work effects a physical change to the body.

This concludes our 4 part series on “BARE ALL, BAREFOOT.” Next week we will have a 2 part series on Golf, Fascial Stretch and Stability. Get Ready to “Swing” into action!

Sources:

BARE ALL, BAREFOOT PART 3: A Review of “The Perfect Runner”

BARE ALL, BAREFOOT PART 3: A Review of “The Perfect Runner”

The Perfect Runner is a stunning film of the evolutionary process of “running” or better yet – “human locomotion” and begs the question, are humans literally born to run?

The documentary “The Perfect Runner” debuted on CBC’s “The Nature of Things” in March and naturally I was eager, eyes peeled to the screen, giddy with anticipation of hearing yet another story of “why I love running so much and why it has always felt natural to me.”

The Perfect Runner follows anthropologist and host Niobe Thompson on his own quest with the “barefoot professors”; Harvard scientists, Dan Leiberman and Dennis Bramble, who ignited a fire with the barefoot running boom that has taken over the world of bipedal endurance athletics with their theory that humans are “born to run.”

These two leading proponents of the “born to run” hypothesis, speculate that we were programmed to run before our brains grew enough intellect to know it! Let me clarify – “because the growth of the human brain proceeded after the emergence of the running body, it was not our intellect that first guaranteed our survival on the ground,” says Leiberman.

 

Bipedal Homo sapiens  – The Natural Endurance Athlete

Let’s take a peek at the mechanics of what makes us unique – The body of Homo sapiens can do two things remarkably well: stride efficiently and regulate body temperature. Leiberman and Bramble show us that the human body is loaded with specialized running features.

The human leg, from the spring mechanics of the arched foot to the neuromuscular web of the facsia lines that bind an interconnected matrix from the tips of the toes to the scalp, following the network of long tendons running up the calf and thigh, is a perfectly formed marriage of muscle and energy-returning “springs”.

The gluteus group is an area that most runners lack stability and strength in and yet (because we sit on it all day for work, humans are not meant to sit, we are meant to move), it ­ is unique to humans among the primates because it propels us forward while stabilizing our torso as we stride and progress forward. Another key mechanical asset, is the nuchal ligament (described much like a large rope) – runs up the back of the head to stabilize the cranium during running, this allows for proper head carriage during locomotion and if we didn’t have it – we would have bobble heads.

Our longer arms, in comparison to our primate cousins, are structured to swing as counterweights to our body’s motion without tiring our shoulders. The muscles of posterior chain and anterior chain, along with the deep arm fascia prevent the shoulders from wobbling all over the map, and literally hold the arms in a perfect sequence as they swing in conjunction with our stride. And then there is our elongate form – long legs, narrow hip, tall torso; which give an elite runner a stride length of 3.5 metres, much farther than any four-legged competitor.

It is relentless natural selection that has promoted the survival of runners; the Homo body form emerged rapidly in response to the changed environment, a classic evolutionary “state shift”.

The Barefoot Debate:

Over the course of the last couple posts I have outlined various reasons why being barefoot is advantageous, as well as why runners are advantageous. The vote still stands that neither one is better than the other, it just depends on your why, when and how.

Pros to running in shoes are protection from the elements and shock absorption. The cons of running with shoes are more hell strike, which actually increases stress into the body. Running barefoot has the benefits of better proprioception and body awareness during movement, research shows that habitually barefoot or minimally shod humans tend not to land on their heels, and instead strike the ground in a way that leads to reduced stress and very low collision forces. We use our natural springs.

 

“Why is one of the world’s poorest countries home to some to the world’s best distance runners?”

This is an excellent question!  In a visually stunning exploration of the human body and our apelike ancestors, we learn how for over 2 million years Homo sapiens have survived in changing environments across the globe – a world ripe with predators.

Africa, is the heart of the world’s top endurance athletes, and uniquely enough is also the birth place of human civilization. Something called the “Persistence Hunt.” The Perfect Runner features unique footage of the only “persistence hunt” ever filmed; which helps unlock the mystery of why humans made a series of paradoxical trade-offs as they evolved, losing strength and natural defenses as they became hairless bipeds on the scorched African plain.

For the past 2 million years, humans have proactively hunted for food – no surprise here. Using this practice called “persistence hunting”, hunters tracked and ran their prey to exhaustion. Yes, the cheetah may be able to sprint and out run the human, but much like anaerobic threshold training any body (man or animal) can only sustain that energy output for a certain amount of time. Homo sapiens would track the hunt and ultimately through endurance – paying close attention to sustained energy output.

On the other side of the globe and moving from one of the hottest places on earth to the coldest – Niobe travels to the most remote part of Arctic Russia, a place where running is still a way of life in the small rural villages. A herder’s life is constant movement – coined “cowboys without horses, running alongside their reindeer” over the ankle-breaking tundra.

 

Taking Cues from Natural Runners:

Niobe goes on to say – “Meanwhile, in the world of elite endurance running, coaches have been taking cues from natural runners for decades, learning from the success of the Ethiopian, Kenyan and Moroccan athletes who dominate the international top ranks. AtNorth America’s Athletics Coaching Centre at theUniversityofAlberta, a long-standing collaboration with Ethiopian runners, including the legendary Haile Gebreselassie, has insured that the rising generation of North American athletes emulates the best African runners. Coaches eschew cushioned running shoes, concentrate on foot strength, use barefoot running as a training method, and always promote forefoot-strike techniques.”

This is definitely a movie worth watching, one that even if you are not a runner, is a great tool to visually see the evolutionary process of hominid and bipedal endurance. Now, I have a hankering to go out for a run!

 

Sources:

The Perfect Runner: http://www.theperfectrunner.com/

Dan Leiberman, Professor of Human Evolutionary Biology, HarvardUniversity: http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~skeleton/danlhome.html

BARE ALL BAREFOOT PART 2: PLANT YOUR ROOTS, “PLANT(AR) FASCIA”

BARE ALL BAREFOOT PART 2: PLANT YOUR ROOTS, “PLANT(AR) FASCIA”

Barefoot running is not a new phenomenon.
It has historically been performed since the dawn of time, out of necessity rather than for recreation. Primitive man and early cultures existed without shoes and survived without the benefit of footwear. In fact, it has been common throughout history all over the world — but in the face of ever-increasing science and technology pumped into shoes, it has risen to popularity as a natural means of exercise.

In the last article we began to debate the pros and cons of barefoot running, and what frequently comes up is a very important consideration and this simple, and quite frankly, general rule of thumb – it depends on the what and why.
The movement has gained a strong following through some scientists’ beliefs that barefoot running can actually improve health in the feet, knees and hips while reducing the rate of common injuries like plantar fasciitis. I have no doubt that this is true for many; however, there are always risk factors, proper adaptations and progressions to consider, and asking the right questions – what activities do I engage in? will this improve my overall performance and health? When and where would barefoot running be implemented and when, what periodized progressions.

In my own personal athletic sphere; I find training in the gym when lifting kettlebells and performing yoga – barefoot is key to my success. I have not yet ventured to the realms of the trails or pounding of the pavement yet, but I will. Now, how about work?  My ultimate goal is to become a Vancouver Police Officer and I can say that without a doubt, barefoot options will not happen here, for 3 key factors (1) public safety hazard, huge risk factors (2) your boots are your protection, if a perp is on the ground, you don’t dive in “hands first,” and your feet are the closest piece of your body to someone on the ground – safety first. (3) long shifts and uncontrolled terrain, you never know where the day or night will take you. My point is that if you are considering barefoot options; you need to consider all spheres of your life and implement as such, with proper implementation.

The Mechanics of the Foot:

Running barefoot allows the mechanics of the foot to operate as it is designed, without restriction and it also connects the runner to the terrain, mother earth. Running barefoot forces the runner to use the foot pads on the balls of the feet when striking the ground rather than touching down with the heel, which can increase the shock absorbed by your legs and feet. A common injury seen in runners and endurance athletes is plantar fascitis.

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the thick band of tissue running across the bottom of the foot, becomes inflamed. Your foot is the foundation, the roots to everything else that sits above. Made up of bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, our feet and hands house the majority of our bone structure.

The plantar fascia is a relatively inflexible, strong, fibrous band on the bottom of the foot that supports the arch of your foot. Beginning at the heel bone, the plantar fascia extends the length of your foot to connect with your toes at the ball of the foot and is an integral part of the superficial back line, one of our many fascia meridians.

 

Superficial Back Line

Insert anatomy 101 here: The Superficial Back Line :

Plantar Fascia > Gastronemius > Hamstrings > Sacrotuberous ligament > Thoracolumbarfascia > Erector Spinae > Nuchal Ligament > scalp fascia ( to “occipital ridge and beyond” well… to the brow bone anyways)

When we walk, weight is distributed across your feet. Any imbalances in the mechanics of the foot and distribution of weight can potentially cause compensation that can lead to injury. When we look at a dissection of this line we can see that the plantar fascia is continuous, covering and transvering around and to the heel and the Achilles tendon upwards through the calves, hamstring, deep fascia of the sacrum and lumbar, even interacting with the sciatic nerve. This begs the question – is what some call “plantar facitis” really the issue, if you experience back pain – that could be the point of origin of breakdown, or perhaps a very poor score on your ASLR (active straight leg raise) – perhaps it’s your hamstrings that are the “bain of the pain”  and not your feet. My point, is there are many things to consider here.

Many proponents of barefoot running and it cannot be jumped into quickly. Let’s look at the shoes for a moment – they allow the foot muscles to relax and exist underdeveloped. And they cushion from impact. Additionally, the bones in the foot and lower body are not accustomed to the stress of barefoot running. When you are starting out, note this.

 

The Superficial Back Line & The Hamstrings:

I find that clients and runners, who exhibit plantar fascia inflammation, also have had calf strains and tight hamstrings, or too much tone in the muscle tissue itself. As humanoids are initial response to pain is to fix and treat the pain referral point – but, remember, it’s all connected and the pain isn’t always the source of the breakdown. Moving on up the leg, try a simple multi-segmental flexion drill and trigger point to release to see if this improves the mechanics of the foot, superficial line and ASLR.

During multi-segmental flexion (toe touch) the primary line that we are asking to be lengthened is the Superficial Back Line and we know that this basically stems from the plantar fascia at the bottom of the foot all the way up to the scalp.  This teaches sensory awareness, as well as teaches relaxation of the tension in the back and superficial line and how to shift the body weight from heels to the toes in a smooth and consistent fashion.

Step One: Soft Tssue Rolling – use a tennis ball (or better yet a foot roller) and roll on the bottoms of the feet (the plantar fascia) for approximately 60sec per foot

Step Two: Toe Touch Progression (I like to start the client off with heels elevated slightly on the half foam first; which is more passive, then work up to toes elevated on the foam and a towel in between the knees for proper tracking of the knee and trunk engagement). Arms extended over head, again NO hyperextension and ensuring the client does not hyperextend the lower back upon returning from flexed position.

If the client has lower back pain or any back related injury (herniated discs, back surgery etc); then flexion you want to stay away from and extension patterning should also be considered with ANY flexion patterning  – it’s all about creating balance.

Dysfunction in motor control tends to be one of the most common causes for altered neuromuscular stabilization of the pelvis and hips and this transfers to our feet. Considering, the psoas and hip flexor group interact with flexion (point of origin of the psoas is lower lumbar, hence it will pull on the back and compress at the hip in flexion of the toe touch progression, you can modify this by performing another movement pattern – the supine  ASLR passive and active leg lowering progression.

Step one: use the foot roller or tennis ball to roll the plantar fascia.

Step Two: ASLR Passive Leg Progression and then moving to the second progression (using a hurdle or door frame). For more information on these progressions you can find a great breakdown in Gray Cook’s book “Athletic Body in Balance” or more for you clinical coaches, Gray’s  book “Movemet” looks at more the SMFA approach.

In any case, always retest and see if there is an immediate improvement in visceral pain of the plantar fascia and improved range of motion in the superficial back line. Some instantly feel release and can be able to touch their toes.

Next week we take a peek at the Barefoot Training and the neuromuscular adaptations and benefits of rooting through your feet in strength and conditioning.

 

Sources:

Dissection of the Lines “Anatomy Trains” – http://www.anatomytrains.com/uploads/rich_media/ATDiss-1.pdf

Gray Cook (links to his books and articles ) – http://graycook.com/

BARE ALL, FEET FIRST

BARE ALL, FEET FIRST

“Walk where there is no path, and leave footprints.” ~ Unknown

For ultra runners, our feet can literally be coined the “tools of our trade.”  Clocking on any given week, my mileage “runs” an average of 140km via commuting, walking and being active for my profession as a corrective movement coach, and then of course training –  frolicking in nature (urban and rural). My feet have surprisingly held up very well over the last 2 decades of “pounding the pavement.” I like to think that Yoga and my Karmatic piggybank are to thank for my good fortune. Some have called me “Gandhi with Sneakers” others have called “a pure nutter.’ I would say both equally apply.

Running has always been my greatest teacher, my salvation, and my savior. Every step can be a tool to build upon the framework of thought, reflection and exploration. A moment in tme to process some of our most internal challenges and our greatest fears. And since I also believe that “fear” is merely “love” masked by shadow – we can all overcome any adversity, with the right strategy.  I have running to thank for creating the space, from which my mind, body and spirit can co-habitate to work through some of those moments where we strive to find balance, truth and our purpose in life. I believe sports and movement are fundamental to this process, and our feet – our greatest asset.

From the Ground Up:

Getting to know the mechanics of your feet and the pivotal role they play in athletics, yoga, movement and grounding is the first step to establishing a solid foundation in your any daily practice. In the yoga tradition, the lowly foot paradoxically has an almost transcendent status. Students will touch or kiss the feet of teachers, mentors and gurus alike – as a means of reverence, appreciation and respect.

Just as the foundation of a home or any structure for that fact, it must be level to support all the structures above it.  This is a perfect metaphor for our feet, as it makes sense to strive for foundational balance and sturdiness to support the legs, spine, upper extremities and the weight of the head, as well as the gravitational compression of our environment.

If our foundation or base is tilted, unsteady or collapsed, it will be reflected up through the body as distortion or misalignment and can cause compensational breakdowns throughout the interconnected systems. Therefore, does it not make sense to consider your feet first, and start cultivating balance from the ground up?

The Foundation of Design:

The foot is the foundation of athletic movements, our root to the earth and often, it is the most neglected. The foot is an intricate structure of 26 bones (I count the  tiny sesamoid bone in the great toe, but this is usually not counted –  let’s honor him here) that form two crossing arches of the foot. The longitudinal arch runs the length of the foot, and the transverse arch runs the width. The muscles of the foot, along with a tough, sinewy tissue known as the plantar fascia, provide secondary support to the foot. The foot has internal muscles that originate and insert in the foot and external muscles that begin in the lower leg and attach in various places on the bones of the foot.

Unlike solid structures, our bodies are mobile temples, and thus our feet are required to be adaptable, flexible and adjust to varied terrain and environmental factors.

When there is pain, the body reacts by changing the way it moves or functions in an effort to reduce the pain. Biomechanical changes or (dis)ease may prevent the normal range of movement and cause further injury. For instance, if there is excessive wear on one side, the foot can shift off its central axis, which can put strain on the knee, hip or sacral areas.  Weakened or unbalanced mechanics found in the feet, often refer pain and discomfort elsewhere in the body and literally can change the way we move through the world.

Our feet also ground us to the earth. Yoga is an exceptional fragment in time to clearly focus on this connection, as well as the obvious summer time walk along the beach, barefoot walk in the park – or barefoot anywhere, as is all the craze with barefoot running (I will save this for another article) as this topic is growing on me.

Reach for the Peak in Mountain:

Take mountain pose for instance; a perfect time to enhance your connection with nature and the earth, and to create malleability in the foot. We do this by taking the time to feel every inch of our feet, where our weight distributes and be stretching it lengthwise and extending it out laterally. By making the foot more elastic, we build an effective trampoline that springs the weight of the body upward. In all standing postures in yoga, these complementary forces of descending weight and rebound are at work.

Also consider postures that allow your connect both your hands and feet to the earth; a few personal favorite of mine are (of course) the sun salutation series (modified to focus on more joint fluidity), forward fold variations (there is something about swaying in the wind and having my feet rooted, but hands grace the floor that is comforting to me), triangle pose (reaching one hand to the sky and the other firmly planted along with me feet to earth is empowering), and lastly a vinyasa of crow pose to teddy bear stand to modified head stand (for some silly reason I find this one inspiring and playful at the same – it reminds me of fooling around in grade 3 gym class). Find posture that resonate with you and re connect this Spring!

As Spring has finally sprung, take some time to walk barefoot and connect to your roots, and during your next yoga practice take time to re connect and give your feet a little more (much needed) TLC.

 

 

 

Experience the Abundance of Nicaragua and “Retreat” with I.BE

Experience the Abundance of Nicaragua and “Retreat” with I.BE

Lifestyle & Yoga Retreat in Jiquilillo, Nicaragua, June 2-9, 2012 with Christie Baumgartner & Erin Tetarenko

“Our passion is to move you towards yours.” – Erin Tetarenko & Christie Baumgartner

What does it mean to “retreat?”  The definition itself, means to move away from something. But, what about, not necessarily moving ‘way’ from something, but what if we shifted our perception of the word to mean – moving ‘back’ towards something.

I see the word “retreat” as the action of moving back  towards my balance, my most pure self. Where I may “retreat” – explore, discover and connect ‘back’ to my inner greatness and at the same time “retreat” from actions and distractions that do not serve this inner greatness.  The great thing I love about retreats is that you get to hang out with people who are doing exactly what you are doing – sourcing out your best possible self, and we all now, connection, discover and play are fundamentally important pillars in this foundation of “bliss seeking.”

Yoga retreats are not only an opportunity to “retreat” from the every day experience of our urban lifestyle, but it’s an opportunity to “do and be” what we love with another community who embraces the same values and appreciation for what life has to offer This community is one rooted in the essence of yoga.

This summer, two well known Yoga Teachers in Vancouver and co-founders of “I.BE” have teamed up to offer  lifestyle experience unlike any other. Erin Tetarenko, who teaches at The Yoga Practice, as well as privately, and Christie Baumgartner who teaches at Semperviva, Chopra Yoga and YYoga, offer you the chance to retreat to the beauty and vibrancy of community, with a Lifestyle & Yoga Retreat in Juquilillo,Nicaragua. Needless to say these two teachers bring a combined wealth of knowledge and experience in the learning and teaching of living the bliss of life’s abundance.

Inspire. Believe. Embrace. Lifestyle Retreats

I.BE supports you in a transformative journey by bringing you insight into yourself – the workings of the mind and body. Therefore, it’s no wonder Yoga Retreats are on the menu in this integrated approach. I.BE Lifestyle Retreats are an opportunity to connect with inspiring people, discover more about yourself, play through movement, and Grow a community.

Supporting the community is a large portion of the retreat experience. Monty’s Beach & Surf Lodge is an earthy piece of hippie heaven ( I can say that, because I am on one). This Lifestyle & Yoga Retreat has more to offer than just practicing yoga, sandy beaches and exceptional company, both Erin and Christie bring 3 main values that embody the essence of the trip and the Juquilillo community.

 

Monty’s Beach & Surf Lodge

Monty’s is a rustic beachfront hide-away on Nicaragua’s gorgeous north Pacific coast. Working with local leaders, owner’s Monty and Gerry thrive in creating projects that serve the community. They believe we are all connected and if we can serve others, we feel joy and fulfillment. All meals are included in the retreat  and you guarantee local, seasonal foods fresh every day!

CONNECTION: Connect with our Global Community is priority. On this trip you will have the opportunity to volunteer with local leaders for a unique opportunity to serve the community in health, sports, education and ongoing sustainability by visiting the local schools and working with the children in the community.

DISCOVER: Apart from the obvious yoga classes you can experience (Yin, Hatha and Vinyasa Flows), you will also have the opportunity to engage in Lifestyle Coaching Workshops designed to support you in creating a more meaningful and fulfilling life.

PLAY: There are plenty of activities to keep you busy. Surfing Lessons and board rentals included. Choose between surfboard, paddle boards, & surf kayaks. There is also natural exploration through hiking, trekking to the volcanoes and natural flora and fauna of Nicaraguan beauty.

 

Q&A with Erin Tetarenko

Q. Yoga for many is a path sought out for personal reflection, self belief, the search for compassionate communion with the self and beyond. You mention that this retreat embodies 3 key themes; connection, discovery and play. How did u and Christie come to choose these values?

 

A.” These themes were inspired by Monty’s Beach Lodge, the community in Jiquilillo and our personal yoga journeys.

In our recent visit to Nicaragua, Christie and I fell in love with the community in Jiquilillo. Our visit captured our hearts and energized our souls. We were inspired by the inviting community connection, natural serenity that encouraged inner exploration, and the freedom of play embodied by all the children. It reminded us what’s important to us: Connection, Discovery, and Playful fun!

Similarly, my personal journey with Yoga has also been one of self-discovery, connecting to a higher power -love, nature, our global community- and has supported me to play freely with movement – an incredible form of self expression.

Our vision for our retreat is to connect to a new way of life through community connections and volunteer, create opportunities to discover more about self, and to embrace playing freely with movement such as yoga, ocean play, and adventure!”

So save the date and start packing!

 

For more information on prices and RSVP deadlines please connect with Erin Tetarenko.

Email: [email protected]

Cell: 778.989.8362

I.BE Website: http://inspirebelieveembrace.com/

Celebrating Women’s Week With The UN Theme for 2012: Connecting Girls: Empowering & Inspiring Futures.

Celebrating Women’s Week With The UN Theme for 2012: Connecting Girls: Empowering & Inspiring Futures.

Today, I was honored to speak at the International Women’s Day annual breakfast hosted and moderated by the Hon. Dr. Hedy Fry, P.C, M.P which focused on the UN theme for 2012: Connecting Girls: Empowering and Inspiring Futures.  To set the stage, the speaker panel consisted of 3 high empowered advocates eagerly anticipating questions posed from a room full of eager women of all ages and backgrounds.

 

Speaker Panel:

Dr. Hedy Fry, P.C, M.P (moderator and host)

Jen Sung, Youth Outreach Coordinator for “Out in Schools”

Sarah Jamieson, RUN4ACAUSE on behalf of supporting Free the Children/ We

Samantha Thompson, Girl Guides of Canada/Global

Women’s equality worldwide begins with the girl. Around the world many women and girls are still denied their basic human rights; the right to an education, the right to choose when or how to have children, the right to have a voice in their community.

Thursday, March 8th 2012 was international women’s day! A day where we take time to celebrate the women and men who strive for equal measure. On this day we not only celebrate how far we have come, but how far we still have to go.

International Women’s Day has been observed since in the early 1900′s, as a time of great expansion and turbulence in the industrialized world that saw booming population growth and the rise of radical ideologies.

Since its birth in the socialist movement, International Women’s Day has grown to become a global day of recognition and celebration across developed and developing countries alike, yet it was a long struggle to do so. It seems that we have only started to scrap the surfance of changing global ideals and dis-empowering ideologies towards women.

For decades, IWD has grown from strength to strength annually. For many years the United Nations has held an annual IWD conference to coordinate international efforts for women’s rights and participation in social, political and economic processes.

In 1993, the UN Women Canada (formerly known as UNIFEM Canada) was founded with the sole vision to focus on the equality of women and to support the advancement of gender equality in line with national priorities.

This IWD, in New York City nearly 400 chief executives worldwide  publicly declared their commitment to implementing the Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs) over the last two years, as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and UN Women Executive Director Michelle Bachelet highlighted at the 4th Annual Equality Means Business Event. But will it be enough?

 “Across the region, men and women have pressed bravely and unequivocally for social justice, dignity, and a say in the decisions that shape their lives. Their progress toward these goals will move only as fast as their progress in empowering women.” – Amat Al Alim Alsoswa – UNDP Director of the Regional Bureau for Arab States”

Last year our IWD Un theme was connected to “equal access to education, training,  science and technology.” This year, our 2012 theme focuses on “empowering rural women” and the UN Women’s theme focuses on “connecting girls: empowering and inspiring futures.” It is critical that we continue to raise awareness and support for women globally.

It is the sole reason why I have dedicated my time, energy and resources to raising funds and the understanding behind rural women and the challenges they face. Thursday marked 365 days of my 365 challenge; which I then extended to 439 days!

Phil Borges Photography Tangail Bangladesh

In the” UN Women’s Report: Facts & Figures: Rural Women & the MGDs”:

”Faced with a lack of services and infrastructure, rural women carry a great part of the burden of providing water and fuel for their households. In rural areas of Guinea, for example, women spend more than twice as much time fetching wood and water per week than men, while in Malawi they spend over eight times more than men on the same tasks. Girls in rural Malawi also spend over three times more time than boys fetching wood and water. Collectively, women from Sub-Saharan Africa spend about 40 billion hours a year collecting water.”

UN Women is one of a number of United Nations agencies charged with supporting countries in moving forward on the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). The eight goals, adopted by the international community in 2000, set targets for 2015 on eradicating poverty, achieving universal primary education, promoting gender equality and empowering women, reducing child mortality, improving maternal health, combating HIV and AIDS and other diseases, ensuring environmental sustainability, and providing financing for development.

Fast Facts: Rural Women & The MGD’s:

  • Rwandahas 56% women parliamentarians  – a world record!
  • Almost 70 percent of employed women inSouth Asia and more than 60 percent of employed women in Sub-Saharan Africa work in agriculture
  • On average, women make up about 43 percent of the agricultural labour force in developing countries.
  • Evidence indicates that if these women had the same access  to productive resources as  men, they could increase yields on their farms by 20 to 30 percent, raising total agricultural output in developing countries by 2.5 to 4 percent, in turn reducing the number of hungry people in the world by 12 to 17 percent.
  • InPakistan, a half-kilometre increase in the distance to school decreases girls’ enrolment by 20 percent
  • An extra year of primary school increases girls’ eventual wages by 10-20 percent, encourages girls to marry later and have      fewer children, and makes them less likely to experience violence.
  • 875 million people are illiterate in the bottom billion. Two-thrids are women, because of inadequate access to education      in rural areas.
  • Between 1990 and 2009, all the regions of the world saw a significant decrease in under-five mortality rates, with some developing regions reaching or approaching 2015 targets.

These are just a few of the facts when it comes to establishing equal rights for women and girls. Rural women face more challenges than urban women, simply because of being too far from water, school, health care and basic life essentials. This is where the most works needs to be done, as well as, where the greatest opportunity and potential stem from. Women are our untapped resource!

 

What I am Doing To Support the WEP and MGDs for Women Globally:

RUN4CAUSE supports and champions the visions of great organizations worldwide. This May is of no exception. On May 20th Vancouver will host the third annual CARE Canada and the Walk In Her Shoes Campaign.  This year I am asking Vancouverites to not only walk or run 6km with me on May 20th (our Vancouver WIHS event), but to spend the next roughly 3 months connecting with us online (facebook and this blog) to learn and understand the complexities women and girls still face day to day.

Whether you support CARE Canada or another local or global organization or cause, this walk is for anyone who advocates for women and children. This walk is about immersion. I encourage you to bring your organizations banners, your advocacy groups, freinds and familes and stand (well….walk or run) in solidarity with me and celebrate the women empowerment goals!

Women Empowered & Walk in Her Shoes: SAVE THE DATE

Friday May 18 @7pm- 10pm @ Denman Cinemas. Join us for a movie night and panel discussion. This event will be the pre event warm up and pep ralley for ourMay 20th 101km. See all 4 short documentaries, engage with our speaker panel, and network in the “market” (aka lobby) and don’t forget the silent auction and draw prizes.

101km Walk in Her Shoes Event for CARE Canada: May 20th  from 6am – 9pm, Join me on our 101km route, divided into 8 legs (8 districts) with 6km, 12km, 24km and 42km markers! Choose your mileage, choose your district and start fundraising! www.care.ca or email Sarah Jamieson at [email protected]

I hope all of you had a wonderful International Women’s Day and I hope to see you our on May 20th!

 

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